Tactial Laser Could Work Like Long-Range Napalm

The Advanced Tactical Laser (ATL) that U.S. Special Forces have begun to test-fire. Intended for “covert strikes.”

It’s not going to kill you quickly.

Wired | Sep 6, 2008

By David Hambling

In science fiction, it’s one zap of a laser gun, and you’re dead. But real-life energy weapons likely won’t work that way.

Take the Advanced Tactical Laser (ATL) that U.S. Special Forces have begun to test-fire. Intended for “covert strikes,” the ATL has been sold on its ability to blast away with pinpoint accuracy. A very rough estimate shows, however, that the effects when you target an individual are not quite what you might expect.

The ATL’s laser beam is widely quoted as being ten centimeters wide at the target. It’s exact power has never been stated, but it’s somewhere in the hundred-kilowatt class. (The ATL has a single 12,000 lb laser module while the “megawatt class” Airborne Laser fourteen modules each of which is slightly larger, so a hundred kilowatts looks like a reasonable estimate. In addition a hundred kilowatts was the power of the original flying laser, the Airborne Laser Laboratory, and it’s the target which new solid state lasers are aiming for, so it seems to be a sort of benchmark for weapons-grade lasers.) It may be somewhat higher (or lower). But by applying a little basic physics we can get a ballpark estimate of what this might do to flesh. For simplicity, I’ll assume flesh has similar properties to water. The heat capacity of water is about 4.2 joules per gram per degree centigrade. The heat of vaporization (the energy needed to turn water at boiling point to steam) is 2261 joules per gram.

So if the beam stays on the same spot of the target for a full two seconds –- which is a very long time under the circumstances –- it would in theory boil off a disc around one centimeter deep. In real life, the laser would be much less effective, as smoke and steam would rapidly degrade the effectiveness of the beam. Also in real life, the energy is likely to be focused at the center of the beam. And flesh is not water. And nobody is going to hand around being lasered that long… But we’re just trying to get a general idea of orders of magnitude here.

Bullets are lethal when they damage a vital organ (like the heart or the brain) or when they cause rapid blood loss. Most likely, a laser of this type would not easily be able to go deep enough to affect a vital organ. Plus, the laser would will be self-cauterizing, with the heat sealing off blood vessels. It’s not going to kill you quickly.

While research in this area tends to be classified. But from what we know, the Air Force considers laser effects on eyes and skin, for the most part. Skin damage is very much easier to achieve than penetration; simply raising skin temperature to (say) 80C/ 180 f to a depth of a couple of millimeters will cause serious blistering (second-third degree burns). If 40% of the body is burned in this way, then the target will be disabled and may die.

A rough calculation suggests that exposed skin would be blistered/burned in under a twentieth of a second, so the beam could play over the target at quite a high rate. It’s unclear whether clothing would have much protective effect or whether it would simply ignite and cause secondary burns.

So instead of “zap-and-you’re-dead” in normal science fiction style, with a hundred kilowatt laser, it’s more a matter of spraying the target all over to ensure they’re done. The description of the ATL as a “long range blow torch” is probably quite accurate.

With this type of weapon, the effects are more like napalm than bullets. Humanitarian protests are likely. And one accidental lasering of a civilian could be enough to prevent the ATL being used as an anti-personnel weapon.

Higher power lasers and smaller beam diameters might be able to get a cleaner kill. The Airborne Laser is several times more powerful than the ATL, but is a huge device mounted in a 747. Very short pulse lasers can produce explosive effects on flesh, but they are a different matter to to continuous beams like the ATL, and I suspect will prove to be much more useful.

Incidentally, you can do the same sort of calculations for the Active Denial System (aka the pain beam) which is also rated at around a hundred kilowatts but which has a beam diameter of two meters. Some have alleged that the non-lethal ADS can be set to be deadly. In reality, it could only become a “death ray” with a much higher power or much smaller beam diameter, neither of which is feasible with the current design. If you really wanted to kill people using microwaves, you would use something with a much longer wavelength/lower frequency than the 95 GHz ADS, but that’s another story…

Footnote: Tank Zapping At the Speed Of Light

How about busting tanks with the ATL? Well, if we conveniently ignore reflection, heat conduction and other complications and just look at the heat requirement, then the best you can hope for a hundred-kilowatt laser with a ten-centimeter spot diameter is that it can melt through a centimeter of steel in around eight seconds. If you have to vaporize the metal it will take longer.

Since the ATL can only fire for a maximum of around 30 seconds each time, it may not be very useful against armored vehicles. However, it should work fairly well against pressurized vessels used for gas storage or munitions (rockets, missiles etc) which can be set off by heating their outer skin.

5 responses to “Tactial Laser Could Work Like Long-Range Napalm

  1. Pingback: IT’S NOT GOING TO KILL YOU QUICKLY….. « uk1884

  2. ConcernedHuman

    Islam (the belief and living accordingly inline with THE One and Only Creator, “muslim” literally means “someone who tries to do Islam”) has already messaged many scientific facts, including the bing bang, the expanding universe, the atomic structure, creation and evolution of both the universe and human kind and the creation of other creatures besides humans and animals.

    Try to overcome your misconceptions due to misinformation based on international politics and the wrong doings of some muslims and open up your mind and heart to Islam, learn Islam from Islam, not from biased mass media or luciferians pretending to be muslims or misguided muslims:

    QuranMiracles(.)com

    WhatsIslam(.)com

    ShareIslam(.)com

    BibleIslam(.)com

    IslamCode(.)com

    TurnToIslam(.)com

    AllahsQuran(.)com

    Peace to all.

  3. Could it be effective in intercepting flying missiles?

  4. Whether you believe that Islam is the religion of peace or the religion of evil is inconsequential. What is without doubt is that there is no god and not allah. What is also without doubt is that those fantasists who follow “god” will undoubtedly soon be using laser weapons invented by scientists who are certain that there is neither “god” nor “allah” on those fantasists who follow “allah”.

  5. Very interesting analysis Max with which I agree. Most of the soldiers, sailors and airmen believe in some kind of god, usually Christian or Jewish, and will be using weapons created by atheist scientists to kill Muslim believers (most of whom will be civilians by the way). Of course, such weapons will also be turned on Americans eventually because it is the pattern to test weapons and tactics in the theater and then bring them back home to use on citizens. Examples are with many non-lethal (socalled) weapons, UAVs etc.

    But I would take it one step further to suggest that those elites who are the financial and doctrinal source behind the scientists and engineers are themselves actually Luciferians who practice the ancient mystery religions of Babylon and Egypt through the secret society system.

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