Daily Archives: July 4, 2006

North Korea threatens nuclear strike

 NK NUKES

North Korea stepped up its anti-U.S. rhetoric yesterday, accusing Washington of mounting military pressure on the regime and vowing to respond to any pre-emptive U.S. attack with an “annihilating” nuclear strike.

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Study Correction Shows Early Vioxx Risk

 FDAMerckVioxx

Study Correction Shows Vioxx Risk Appeared Early On, Not Over Longer Term As Drug Maker Contended
A correction published Monday by a trade journal to a key study on withdrawn painkiller Vioxx reveals the risk of heart problems was elevated throughout the time people took the drug and did not develop only after 18 months of use as the drug’s maker, Merck & Co., has contended. The correction in the New England Journal of Medicine supports many doctors’ contention that risks showed up with as little as four months of use.

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Weather modification takes another step

A Florida man’s theory of weakening a hurricane through the introduction of absorbent powder illustrates a new trend in science, weather modification. While China currently seeds clouds for rain and Canadian companies attempt to limit incoming hailstorms, this newest weather modification theory created by Peter Cordani focuses on virtually eliminating the destructive force of a hurricane, the Chicago Tribune reports.

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Sex offenders in Britain to get Prozac

Jailed pedophiles and other sex offenders in Britain will receive Prozac to help them avoid committing more of the same crimes, the Independent said. The newspaper said beginning this fall, the government plans to give the anti-depressant drug to 100 prisoners in nine jails. Some officials believe the drug can suppress obsessive sexual urges.

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GIs May Have Planned Iraq Rape, Slayings

Investigators believe American soldiers spent nearly a week plotting an attack in which they raped an Iraqi woman, then killed her and her family in an insurgent-ridden area south of Baghdad, a U.S. military official said Saturday. The official, speaking on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing, said the attack appeared “totally premeditated” and that the soldiers apparently “studied” the family for about a week before carrying out the attack.

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Tibetan dissident to accuse Chinese of torture and genocide

The case accuses the retired leaders, who were in office during the 1980s and 1990s, of authorising massacres and torture in Tibet. The court could call for the Chinese government to arrest those accused of human rights abuse – and even impound their property.

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Silenced

Silenced – China’s Great Wall of Censorship
This book takes the reader on a fascinating and disturbing trip behind China’s Great Wall of Censorship. It also tells the story of Voice of Tibet, the radio station China couldn’t silence. In China and Tibet freedom of speech and opinion is suppressed. No dissident voices are tolerated, and all media and communication channels are controlled and used as tools in the Party’s quest to maintain its power monopoly. Many are demanding more openness and freedom, warning that the ongoing media crackdown is “sowing the seeds of disaster for political and social transition.”

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Chinese law could fine disaster reporting
A Chinese law imposing fines on media that report emergencies such as riots and natural disasters without official approval could go into effect by October, the government said Tuesday, as a rights group urged Beijing to scrap it. Critics said the proposed law raised concerns over journalists’ right to report on matters of public interest.

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Bill would step up censorship during crises
Reporters Without Borders today condemned proposals to step up censorship of the media’s coverage of natural catastrophes, public health crises and industrial accidents contained in a crisis management bill that came before the standing committee of the national people’s congress on 24 June 2006. The bill envisages fines of 50,000 to 100,000 yuan (5,000 to 10,000 euros) for media that publish unauthorised information on such subjects.

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Appeal court upholds cyber-dissident Li Changqing’s three-year sentence for “alarmist information”
According to Boxun, a news website based aboard, an appeal court in the city of Fuzhou (in the southeastern province of Fujian) has upheld the three-year prison sentence which Li Changqing received in January for allegedly fabricating and disseminating “alarmist information” on the Internet. Arrested in February 2005, Li is currently in Yongan prison, where he has undergone a “course of adaptation to prison life.” For the first time since his arrest, his wife was able to visit him on 15 June. She said he had a stomach inflammation and was very weak.

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Alan Dershowitz: Should we fight terror with torture?

Torture Meister 

The United States’ Supreme Court has ruled that military tribunals at Guantanamo Bay breach the human rights of inmates. But in an age of suicide bombings and mass civilian casualties, do our laws themselves need to be rewritten? Are we just ignoring the unpalatable truth: that the survival of our society may depend on the legalised torture of terror suspects? Here, America’s leading liberal lawyer, Alan Dershowitz, presents the case for radical reform

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