Daily Archives: August 19, 2006

FDA approves viruses as food additives

FDA Says Viruses Safe for Treating Meat
First-ever approval of viruses as a food additive
A mix of bacteria-killing viruses can be safely sprayed on cold cuts, hot dogs and sausages to combat common microbes that kill hundreds of people a year, federal health officials said Friday in granting the first-ever approval of viruses as a food additive. The combination of six viruses is designed to be sprayed on ready-to-eat meat and poultry products, including sliced ham and turkey, said John Vazzana, president and chief executive officer of manufacturer Intralytix Inc.
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FDA approves viruses for food
A mix of bacteria-killing viruses can be safely sprayed on cold cuts, hot dogs and sausages to combat common microbes that kill hundreds of people a year, federal health officials said Friday in granting the first approval of viruses as a food additive. The combination of six viruses is designed to be sprayed on ready-to-eat meat and poultry, including sliced ham and turkey, said John Vazzana, president and chief executive of manufacturer Intralytix.
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FDA approves bacteria-killing virus mix for cold cuts, hot dogs
According to the F-D-A, you won’t know the items have been treated.
Here’s food for thought next time you head for the deli counter. Federal health officials say a mix of six bacteria-killing viruses can safely be sprayed on cold cuts. In fact, they’re also O-K for use on hot dogs and sausages. It’s all part of an effort to fight common microbes that kill hundreds and sicken thousands each year. The Food and Drug Administration is allowing the viruses to be sprayed on ready-to-eat meat and poultry products. They can be applied to items like sliced ham or turkey before packaging. According to the F-D-A, you won’t know the items have been treated.
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FDA Says Spraying Virus Combo On Meat Can Safely Kill Bacteria
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) declares a combination of six viruses can be safely sprayed on meat and poultry to kill common bacteria. The mixture of microbes, called bacteriophages, can combat Listeria monocytogenes, which can result in serious infections. The viruses are designed to be sprayed on meat and poultry right before they are packaged. The bacterium they target can lead to listeriosis, an infection found mostly in pregnant women, newborns and adults with compromised immune systems.
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Chertoff Seeks Support on Real ID

We’re Not Big Brother claims Chertoff
Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff called on state legislators Thursday to embrace new federal driver’s license requirements to strengthen security, but state lawmakers later demanded that Congress either fund the program or drop it. In a speech at the annual meeting of the National Conference of State Legislatures, Chertoff sought to allay privacy concerns about the federal Real ID Act, saying there are no plans to create a federal database of drivers’ personal information. “We don’t want to have that kind of big-brother, federal-government-owns-it approach,” he said.

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Hungary to introduce biometric passports

Hungary will begin to issue biometric passports in conformity with European Union (EU) standards on Aug. 29, the Interior Ministry’s Central Data Office said on Thursday. The machine-readable document will carry a micro-chip containing the holder’s personal data and digital photo, which makes it more difficult to be forged illegally, said Gyorgy Urban, director of the office. He said the date for introducing the new passport coincides with the deadline set by the EU in February 2005, which allowed an 18-month period for technical development
The color of the new document will be dark red, instead of the current blue passport, said the official, adding that as of July 2009, the chip of the new passport will also carry the holder’s digital fingerprint.

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Sensors ‘talking’ to finger swipes

Pay for the groceries, lock the house, start the car, check in at a doctor’s office or log on to a laptop. An evolving digital tool, biometric-fingerprint technology holds the promise of replacing or lessening reliance on everyday necessities such as credit cards, key chains and passwords. It even helps registered travelers get through security at Orlando International Airport. A supporter of the use of biometrics, Scott Moody is CEO of AuthenTec, a company that produces sensors that can read a fingerprint.

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Uzbekistan: Internet Under Surveillance

All sites which criticise Uzbekistan have been blocked, Internet cafes are under surveillance and emails are frequently blocked.
Surfers are limited to a handful of government-approved sites in a country that has been dubbed an internet black hole. It was May 2001 when President Islam Karimov proclaimed the “era of the internet” in Uzbekistan. Five years on, however, the picture is grim. In the wake of the Andijan massacre, Uzbekistan is more closed off than ever and the government has taken almost total control of the country’s last source of independent information – the internet. All sites which criticise Uzbekistan have been blocked along with those offering a more positive perspective on the country and its politics. Internet cafes are under surveillance and emails are frequently blocked.

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Bush urges France to commit more troops to Lebanon force

The French government has hit back against criticism that it has fallen short of expectations in helping to maintain the ceasefire in Lebanon as President George Bush urged France to send more troops. Mr Bush raised the pressure on France. “France has said they’d send some troops,” he said. “We hope they send more. There’s been different signals coming out of France.” UN diplomats said the French military had got cold feet once it emerged that the resolution setting up the ceasefire conditions provided for an expanded UN force, rather than a multinational one, and feared that the proposed rules of engagement would not be robust enough. One French diplomat said “the military has a deep mistrust of the UN, because of Bosnia”, where troops were undermined by a weak mandate.

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Army accepting older recruits

Margie Black had wanted to enter the military as a teenager, but having her first child at 19 put off her ambitions.
So when she learned the Army raised its enlistment age, Black, now a 41-year-old grandmother from West Columbia, Texas, didn’t hesitate to join. The decision took “about 30 seconds,” she said. On Friday, Pvt. Black worked on her marksmanship skills here, while her 21-year-old daughter was at Army basic training at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. “I’m taking it one day at a time,” Black said. “If I do that, I can handle it.” Older soldiers like her are showing up more often at Army training bases across the country since Congress gave the service approval earlier this year to raise its enlistee age limit, which had been 35, to just under 42 years.

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