Daily Archives: September 16, 2006

Post-9/11 antiterror technology: A report card

Operation 9/11 was a smashing success. A true Triumph of the Will! The pretext worked like a charm. In their traumatized condition, the mind-control could be easily inserted into the unsuspecting minds of the ignorant. All the Big Brother technologies could be safely rolled out with no one batting an eye. Progress is being made toward a New World Order where humans are transformed into useful cyborgs and monitored around the clock in a high-tech surveillance grid. They are fattening up nicely for the slaughter as we see obesity levels at epidemic proportions worldwide. The slaves are learning to love their servitude as Huxley predicted the use of pharmacology would make humans more controllable. Liberties could now be surrendered. Sovereignty could now be seen as an antiquated concept. World Government is being installed as a result of pretextual World War. The Good Cops and the Bad Cops are working together at the top of the control pyramid to manage the Hegelian control of the past, present and future. All is going precisely according to plan. The Luciferian dream of total domination is at hand!

War is Peace. Slavery is freedom. Ignorance is Strength. All hail our Illuminati Grand Masters of Illusion. And if you can’t beat em, join em. Right?

WRONG!!!

PW

Five years after the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, the federal government’s record of adopting antiterrorism technologies has been mixed. Puffers, chemical scanners and biometrics devices are appearing in airports. Radio-frequency chips are being inserted in U.S. passports. The U.S. Army has developed machine-gun toting robots for deployment in Iraq. CNET News.com has compiled a list of 10 technologies, five that should be adopted more speedily to help in homeland security efforts–and five that raise at least some privacy and security concerns. 
But the FBI is still struggling with computer systems that are at least half a decade out of date, Homeland Security is having similar problems with inspections of shipping containers, and it’s hardly clear that RFID-equipped passports are any safer from duplication by an identity thief or enterprising member of al-Qaida. CNET News.com has compiled a list of 10 technologies, five that should be adopted more speedily to help in homeland security efforts–and five that raise at least some privacy and security concerns. Read on for the details.

CNET

Castro elected president of Nonaligned Movement Nations

 annan_castro

Communist Dictator-For-Life Fidel Castro (R) meets with CFR-bankrolled UN chief Annan as he recovers from stomach surgery, in Havana,  Sept. 14, 2006. (Xinhua Photo)

Cuban President Fidel Castro was elected Friday as president of the Nonaligned Movement (NAM) Nations during its 14th Summit here at the Convention Center. At the suggestion of Malaysian Prime Minister Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, the heads of state or government from more than 100 member countries applauded the decision to choose the Cuban leader as president of the Nonaligned Nations, a duty he will assume for the second time.
Shortly before, Cuban Foreign Minister Felipe Perez Roque announced that Castro will not lead the Cuban delegation to the forum after doctors insisted he must have a rest. Castro is recovering from a surgery in late July.
The summit meeting also approved Cuban’s First Vice President Raul Castro to act as the acting president until Fidel Castro is fully recovered.

news.xinhuanet.com

Experimental AI Powers Robot Army

The Air Force robots may look like cockroaches, or they may be “snakebots” like those currently in development. Thaler has carried out validation tests by using the software to control small H3 “robot cockroaches.” The results are classified, he said.


Darpa’s Grand Challenge may have looked tough, but it was a piece of cake compared to the challenge facing robots currently being developed by the U.S. Air Force. Rather than maneuver driverless through miles of rough desert terrain, these will have to find their way into underground bunkers, map unknown facilities in three dimensions and identify what’s in them while avoiding detection — all without any human control.
This is well beyond the capability of any existing system, but the Air Force Research Laboratory, or AFRL, is putting its hopes on new software that lets robots learn, walk, see and interact far more intelligently than ever before. Perhaps the most impressive — and spookiest — aspect of the project is the swarming behavior of the robots. In computer simulations, they acted together to tackle obstacles and grouped together into defensive formations where needed, Thaler said. The Air Force robots may look like cockroaches, or they may be “snakebots” like those currently in development. Thaler has carried out validation tests by using the software to control small H3 “robot cockroaches.” The results are classified, he said.

wired.com

Microwave weapon intensified by sweaty skin

The Pentagon’s “less-lethal” microwave-based crowd-control weapon – the Active Denial System (ADS) – produces potentially harmful hotspots when used in built-up areas, and its effects can be intensified by sweaty skin, tests have revealed. The flaws call into question the weapon’s usefulness in hot conditions, like those in Iraq.


The ADS fires a microwave beam intended to heat skin without causing damage, while inflicting enough pain to force the victim to move away. However, tests of the weapon showed that reflections off buildings, water or even the ground can produce peak energy densities twice as high as the main beam. Contact with sweat or moist fabric such as a sweaty waistband further intensifies the effect.


The safety concerns, revealed in the details of 14 tests carried out by the US air force between 2002 and 2006, were acquired under a Freedom of Information request by Edward Hammond of the Sunshine Project USA, which campaigns against the use of biological and non-lethal weapons.

dw.com

Daily Show interview with Ray Kurzweil: Nanobots, microchip implants and the merging of man and machine by 2030

Daily Show interview with Ray Kurzweil: Nanobots, microchip implants and the merging of man and machine by 2030

Americans’ Role Eyed in U.N. Oil Scandal

Were American Oil Brokers Involved in Iraq Oil Kickback Schemes?
Former American fugitive Marc Rich was a middleman for several of Iraq’s suspect oil deals in February 2001, just one month after his pardon from President Clinton, according to oil industry shipping records obtained by ABC News. And a U.S. criminal investigation is looking into whether Rich, as well as several other prominent oil traders, made illegal payments to Iraq in order to obtain the lucrative oil contracts.

abcnews.go.com

One Million Ways to Die

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Your appendix is more likely to kill you than al-Qaida is.
Sept. 11, 2001 was undoubtedly one of the darkest and deadliest days in United States history. Al-Qaida’s attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center killed 2,976 people, and the country recoiled in horror as we witnessed the death of thousands of Americans when the towers fell. In the five years since that shattering day, the government has spent billions on anti-terrorism projects, instituted a color-coded alert system that has never been green, banned fingernail clippers and water bottles from airplanes, launched a pre-emptive war on false pretenses, and advised citizens to stock up on duct tape and plastic sheeting. But despite the never-ending litany of warnings and endless stories of half-baked plots foiled, how likely are you, statistically speaking, to die from a terrorist attack? Comparing official mortality data with the number of Americans who have been killed inside the United States by terrorism since the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma reveals that scores of threats are far more likely to kill an American than any terrorist — at least, statistically speaking. In fact, your appendix is more likely to kill you than al-Qaida is.

wired.com