Daily Archives: January 13, 2007

Livestock Tags Precursors for Human Sheep

Business Week | Jan 11, 2007

sheople

I just need to make a quick comment about the author of this article. These media whores are very adept at selling you the diabolical products of the New World Order including wars, corrupt business deals, genetically modified foods, junk food, toxic drugs and vaccines, global government, the submergence of America into the North American Union, the stripping of our constitutional rights and much, much more.

This David Gumpert is an ad copy writer selling you the microchip implant in this cutesy article which is just one long advertisement for Digital Angel and Verichip, for your safety and convenience of course. He does gives a little nod, giggle and a wink to “conspiracy theorists”, but not enough to do any damage, or maybe so he thinks. At the end, of page 2 he snickers saying, “It may be a while before we all begin wearing medical information chips in our arms, but the farm animals are telling us it’s closer than we may have imagined,” as if to say it’s all inevitable and so get ready to get yours soon and, wink-wink, “the farm animals are telling us” to get chipped. So it must be okay.

All I gotta say is these slick ad copy writers like David Gumpert are pure degenerate scum who have already sold their souls to the New World Order and would sell their own children into slavery for a few pieces of silver. So, go to hell Gumpert. When all the big lies are exposed, so will you and your ilk be exposed.

PW

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People Tags Are More Profitable

Two cousin companies bet the fast-expanding market for animal RFID chips will extend to humans before long

While the NAIS remains voluntary on a federal level, and there is no formal people identification system as yet, both executives are moving aggressively to position their companies for the day when chips in animals and people are the norm rather than the exception. Mary Zanoni, a lawyer and critic of NAIS who has written extensively about the system, says that “the microchipping of livestock and pet animals is intended to make tagging more acceptable in helping these companies market their devices for people.”

Business May Compel Chip Wearing

Adoption of the RFID chips doesn’t necessarily need to be legislated to become nearly universal. If enough hospitals and insurance companies begin requiring them, or treating patients wearing them more expeditiously than nonusers, or providing discounts for usage of the chips, they well could become the norm. Then, not wearing a chip might be akin to not having a bank ATM card or, increasingly in Eastern states with toll roads and turnpikes, not having a transponder to pay tolls in your car.

Under the federally supported National Animal Identification System (NAIS), digital tags are expected to be affixed to the U.S.’s 40 million farm animals to enable regulators to track and respond quickly to disease, bioterrorism, and other calamities. Opponents have many fears about this plan, among them that it could be the forerunner of a similar system for humans. The theory, circulated in blogs, goes like this: You test it on the animals first, demonstrating the viability of the radio frequency identification devices (RFIDs) to monitor each and every animal’s movements and health history from birth to death, and then move on to people.

Well, all you conspiracy buffs, let me introduce you to Kevin McGrath and Scott Silverman.

McGrath heads a small, growing company that makes RFID chips for animals…and people.

Silverman heads a second company that sells the rice-size people chips, which are the only ones with Food & Drug Administration (FDA) approval, for implantation in an individual’s right biceps. They carry an identity marker that would be linked to medical records. His goal is to create “the first RFID company for people.”

Human-Chip Company Plans IPO

While the NAIS remains voluntary on a federal level, and there is no formal people identification system as yet, both executives are moving aggressively to position their companies for the day when chips in animals and people are the norm rather than the exception. Mary Zanoni, a lawyer and critic of NAIS who has written extensively about the system, says that “the microchipping of livestock and pet animals is intended to make tagging more acceptable in helping these companies market their devices for people.”

McGrath’s company, Digital Angel (DOC), does nearly $60 million in annual sales and has sold several million chips for attachment to livestock, mostly in the U.S. and Canada.

Silverman’s company, VeriChip Corp., is preparing for widespread marketing of its people chips with an initial public offering that it expects to complete within the next 60 days. It has begun building what he refers to as “the infrastructure” by signing up more than 400 hospitals to adopt system scanners and databases and about 1,200 physicians to make chips available to patients likeliest to benefit from them, such as diabetics.

While McGrath and Silverman aren’t related, their companies are. Digital Angel and VeriChip have the same majority owner. Applied Digital Solutions (ADSX), the parent of seven smaller companies, owns 55% of Digital Angel and all of VeriChip.

[…and ADS is owned by IBM, the company that set up the Nazi concentration camp tracking system. So if you think this is loving, then I guess you think tattooing the Jews was loving too. PW]

Super Soldiers: Tomorrow’s ‘Army of One’ Technology

Information Liberation | Jan 12, 2007 

“The individual may think that the most important reality is his own existence, but this is only his personal point of view. This lacks historical perspective. Man does NOT HAVE THE RIGHT to develop his own mind. This kind of liberal orientation has great appeal. We must ELECTRICALLY CONTROL THE BRAIN. Some day armies and generals will be controlled by electric stimulation of the brain.”

– Dr. Jose M.R. Delgado, Spanish Fascist, CIA scientist, Director of Neuropsychiatry Yale University Medical School Congressional Record, No. 26, Vol. 118 February 24, 1974. Wrote  “Physical Control of the Mind, Toward a Psychocivilized Society” Jose M. R. Delgado, M.D. (Harper & Row, NY, 1969)

 future-warrior

Within three years, soldiers could begin testing futuristic devices that make them each “an army of one” by granting them unprecedented capabilities, such as the ability to see through walls thanks to advanced radar scopes and super-protection and super-strength conferred by high-tech armor.

Although some of the technologies could take years to reach actual battlefields, novel devices developed by the U.S. Army’s Future Force Warrior initiative such as advanced sound equipment and smarter lasers should be available to active soldiers as soon as 2010, promising to make them more lethal than ever.

They’ll also be better protected. For example, current armor can keep bullets and shrapnel from wounding soldiers directly, but they can carry shock waves to the body that can break ribs and cause other injuries. Improvements will provide a more protective 2-inch gap between soldiers and their armor.

Also, by 2010, body-worn sensors that monitor respiration, heart rate, and shock waves from bullets, will let medics know right away when soldiers get injured.

“They will also tell a soldier’s distance and direction, so a medic knows where to go,” said Jean-Louis “Dutch” DeGay, an equipment specialist at the U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Mass.

The Borg effect

Soldiers will also get lasers to mount on their weapons to relay the location of enemies to everyone with whom and to which they are networked, ranging from other soldiers to Apache helicopters to Abrams tanks, DeGay explained.

“We call it the Borg effect,” DeGay told SPACE.com, referring to the Star Trek cyborgs linked together to form a nearly unstoppable force.

Next-generation helmets for 2010 will also integrate electronics that pick up vibrations from the skull and transmit sound directly into the head instead of using traditional microphones and earpieces. They will improve soldiers’ ability to discern varying sounds. “It doesn’t matter if you’re whispering or yelling, it can still hear you,” DeGay said.

Of 744,000 homeless estimated in US, 41 percent are in families

Boston Globe |  Jan 11, 2007

There were 744,000 homeless people in the United States in 2005, according to the first national estimate in a decade.

A little more than half were living in shelters, and nearly a quarter were chronically homeless, according to the report yesterday by the National Alliance to End Homelessness, an advocacy group.

A majority of the homeless were single adults, but about 41 percent were in families, the report said.

The group compiled data collected by the Department of Housing and Urban Development from service providers throughout the country. It is the first national study on the number of homeless people since 1996. That study came up with a wide range for America’s homeless population: between 444,000 and 842,000.

Counting people without permanent addresses, especially those living on the street, is an inexact process. But the new study is expected to provide a baseline to help measure progress on the issue.

Chavez Vows To Follow Jesus Christ’s Lead

Click on Detroit | Jan 11, 2007 

commie_christ

His right hand raised Wednesday, Chavez declared in words reminiscent of Fidel Castro’s famous call-to-arms: “Fatherland, socialism or death — I swear it.” He also alluded to Jesus: “I swear by Christ — the greatest socialist in history.”

Invoking Christ and Castro as his socialist models, President Hugo Chavez began his third term Wednesday by declaring that socialism, not capitalism, is the only way forward for Venezuela and the world.
 
His first stop: Nicaragua, where he joined leftist ally Daniel Ortega, who returned to power in an inaugural ceremony just hours later. Chavez is now set to remain president until 2013 — or longer if he gets his way with a constitutional amendment allowing him to run again.

At the apex of a resurgent Latin American left, Chavez has been emboldened to make more radical changes at home after winning re-election with 63 percent of the vote, his widest margin ever.

His next moves include nationalizing electrical and telecommunications companies, forming a commission to oversee constitutional reforms and asking the National Assembly, now entirely controlled by his supporters, to allow him to enact “revolutionary laws” by presidential decree.

His right hand raised Wednesday, Chavez declared in words reminiscent of Fidel Castro’s famous call-to-arms: “Fatherland, socialism or death — I swear it.” He also alluded to Jesus: “I swear by Christ — the greatest socialist in history.”

In a speech, he said the central aim of his term will be “to build Venezuelan socialism.”

“I don’t have the slightest doubt that is the only path to the redemption of our peoples, the salvation of our fatherland,” Chavez told lawmakers to applause.

Meth Coffee Launches with Super Caffeinated Brew

Food Ingredients First | Jan 12, 2007

Meth Coffee, a rebel coffee company in San Francisco, opened for business with the launch of its hard- hitting coffee roast for energy addicts and caffeine freaks. Meth’s super- caffeinated beans are amplified by the addition of yerba mate, a powerful natural stimulant and antioxidant used by shamans of the Amazon for boosting stamina and mental clarity. Boasting an intense buzz and cocoa-tobacco finish, Meth Coffee is fresh-roasted within 48 hours of shipment to jumpstart workaholics, thrill seekers, artists, and subversives seeking an exciting new fuel for their endeavors.

The flavor of Meth Coffee’s Arabian and South American beans with yerba mate starts as a smooth, herbaceous attack that runs to a soft tobacco-cocoa finish. Yerba mate’s presence produces a gradual buzz arc for periods of intense play and creativity that some drinkers find more cerebral than coffee alone. Research has shown that yerba mate contains mateine, an alkaloid stimulant similar to those found in coffee and chocolate, as well as significant antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds.

TV drama “The Trial of Tony Blair” depicts a fictional war-crimes trial for Blair

Miami Herald | Jan 10, 2007 

blair_torture_dog

The British TV channel behind Death of a President — a drama in which President George W. Bush was assassinated — is throwing a similar fictional spotlight on its own leader, Tony Blair: After retiring, the prime minister faces a possible war-crimes trial.

The Trial of Tony Blair, which airs Monday, takes place in 2010: Hillary Clinton is U.S. president, and Gordon Brown, Blair’s finance minister, has taken over as prime minister. Blair, haunted by the continuing carnage in Iraq, is tormented by an obsession with his legacy that blinds him to the looming threat of an indictment by the International Criminal Court.

Blair is played by respected British actor Robert Lindsay.

Channel 4, the broadcaster that operates the digital channel More4, said the show was a ”comedy-drama,” which would have some light moments. But the message was meant to be taken seriously, spokesman Gavin Dawson said.

”You want people to be provoked into thinking about the world around them,” Dawson said, adding that the show had been in the works before Death of a President generated enormous controversy — and buzz — for the station in Britain and abroad.

The drama does not feature the actual trial, concluding with Blair flying off to defend himself at The Hague.

Blair wants UK to stay globocop

Times of India | Jan 12, 2007  

Britain must continue to be “fighter and peacekeeper”in disparate parts of the world, prime minister Tony Blair has said, provoking a heated debate on whether it is viable for the UK to be “a mini-America”in the post-9/11 world.

Blair’s keynote foreign policy speech late on Friday afternoon challenged Britain to decide now and for all time whether it wants to be major defence power in the future and long-term key player in the future.

The impassioned plea for Britain to be a neo-imperialist, sometimes militaristic power on the world stage is Blair’s most robust defence yet of his controversial policy of muscular intervention in failing states around the world. He said hard and soft power was interlinked in today’s world and Britain had to have both.

The speech, which swept a broad arc through Britain’s past military engagements, including colonial ones such as India, called for a debate on whether the UK should continue to send troops to trouble spots after Blair leaves office later this year.