British teenagers have lower IQs than their counterparts did 30 years ago

Teenagers in Britain have lower IQ scores than their counterparts did a generation ago, according to a study by a leading expert.

British teenage IQ could be due to youth culture having “stagnated” or even dumbed down.

Telegraph | Feb 11, 2009

By Richard Gray, Science Correspondent

Tests carried out in 1980 and again in 2008 show that the IQ score of an average 14-year-old dropped by more than two points over the period.

Among those in the upper half of the intelligence scale, a group that is typically dominated by children from middle class families, performance was even worse, with an average IQ score six points below what it was 28 years ago.

The trend marks an abrupt reversal of the so-called “Flynn effect” which has seen IQ scores rise year on year, among all age groups, in most industrialised countries throughout the past century.

Professor James Flynn, of the University of Otago in New Zealand, the discoverer of the Flynn effect and the author of the latest study, believes the abnormal drop in British teenage IQ could be due to youth culture having “stagnated” or even dumbed down.

He used data gathered in IQ tests on UK children to examine how the country’s cognitive skills have changed over time.

He found that while children aged between five and 10 saw their IQs increase by up to half a point a year over the three decades, teenagers performed less well.

“It looks like there is something screwy among British teenagers,” said Professor Flynn. “While we have enriched the cognitive environment of children before their teenage years, the cognitive environment of the teenagers has not been enriched.

“Other studies have shown how pervasive teenage youth culture is, and what we see is parents’ influence on IQ slowly diminishing with age.

“Up until the age of nine and ten, the home has a really powerful influence, so we can assume parents have been providing their children with a more cognitive challenging environment in the past 30 years.

“After that age the children become more autonomous and they gravitate to peer groups that set the cognitive environment.

“What we know is that youth culture is more visually orientated around computer games than they are in terms of reading and holding conversations.”

He added that previous studies have shown that IQ increases as teenagers move into adulthood, entering university or starting work.

Professor Flynn also believes that the larger drop in IQ among the upper half of the ability range could be due to effects of social class.

He said: “IQ gains are typically correlated by class, but the results in this case are very mixed. Maybe the rebellious peer culture of the lower half of British society has invaded the peer culture of the upper half.

“It could be the classes in the upper half were insulated from this rebellious peer culture for a time, but now it is universal.”

His research, which is presented in a paper published online by the journal Economics and Human Biology, also refutes the commonly held belief that increases in IQ over time are a result of improving nutrition.

Previous research has suggested that using text messages and email causes concentration to drop, temporarily reducing IQ by 10 points, while smoking marijuana has been associated with a four-point drop in IQ.

IQ, or intelligence quotient, is normally expressed as a single numerical score, with 100 being the average.

Professor Flynn’s study was conducted using a respected IQ test known as Raven’s Progressive Matrices. Questions involve matching a series of patterns and sequences, so that even people with no education can take the test.

Dr John Raven, the Edinburgh-based psychologist who invented the test, said he was surprised by the fall in teenage IQ.

He said: “IQ is influenced by multiple factors that can be dependent upon culture, but the norms tend to be very similar across cultures even in societies that have no access to computers and television.

“What we do see is that IQ changes dramatically over time.”

He cautioned that since the study did not record the social class of participants, “it is very difficult to make inferences about how changes within social classes can impact on these changes in IQ”.

Richard House, a senior lecturer in therapeutic education at Roehampton University and a researcher into the effects of television on children, said: “Taking these findings at face value, it appears that there is something happening to teenagers.

“Computer games and computer culture has led to a decrease in reading books. The tendency for teachers to now ‘teach to the test’ has also led to a decrease in the capacity to think in lateral ways.”

3 responses to “British teenagers have lower IQs than their counterparts did 30 years ago

  1. Not really surprising but I am not quite sure they got the numbers all right. Plus, the piece on marijuana casts a slight shadow of doubt upon the validity of the article.
    I agree somewhat with the last part – about computers. I say somewhat because I do notice this in myself, I am more eager to spend time on the computer than read a book, thought that has been changing for the past months. On the other hand, if I didn’t use a computer as often as I have done, I would’ve been a completely different person and that is not to say that for the better. In fact, I learned a whole lot about history, mythology, geography from computer games alone, as well as furthering my apetite for lecture about history, especially antiquity. Plus it has been shown that strategy games lead to an increase in memory and an improvement in the ability to multi-task.
    All in all, it’s never good to generalize as the use of computers will lead different people to different outcomes.

  2. Monosodium glutamate, aspartame, vaccinations.

  3. Just the British?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s