Daily Archives: July 18, 2011

A new model army tears its clothes off for ‘amazing’ Putin


Diana, one of a new army of female Putin supporters

independent.co.uk | Jul 18, 2011

By Shaun Walker in Moscow

Young women across Russia have been called on to show their support for Vladimir Putin in an unusual way: by ripping off their clothes. The unexpected campaign has been launched by a group calling itself the Putin Army, which posted a slick video online at the weekend featuring a trio of young women announcing a competition.

“I’m just crazy about a man who changed our country,” says a voiceover, as we see “Diana” walking through Moscow, while the camera frequently hovers over her sizeable bust. “He’s a great politician, and an amazing man. He’s Vladimir Putin,” she says, adding that despite the millions who admire him, there are some who “pour dirt on him, maybe because they are scared of him, or because they themselves are weak”.

Later in the video, Diana meets two nubile friends sunbathing by the riverbank, and they daub “I’ll tear [clothes off] for Putin” onto skimpy T-shirts in red paint. The video ends as they rip the T-shirts off. They ask other “young, smart and beautiful” girls to “tear off something for Putin” and post a video of it online. The best entrant will win an iPad. It is unclear who is behind the Putin Army, but the video is professionally produced, and bears the hallmarks of one of the pro-Kremlin youth organisations such as Nashi.

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Girls urged to strip to support Vladimir Putin as president

The Putin Army’s homepage on a Russian social-networking site is dominated by a photograph of Mr Putin in a bright-red lounge suit and wearing a pair of aviator sunglasses.

Presidential elections are due next year, and many expect Mr Putin to return to the job he did for eight years until 2008. He stepped aside because of the two-term constitutional limit, but he is still seen as more powerful than President Dmitry Medvedev.

Last year, students from the journalism faculty at a Moscow University posed for a raunchy calendar. Earlier this year, there was also a “Putin party” at a top Moscow nightclub, where strippers sang to Mr Putin’s rendition of “Blueberry Hill”. Kirill Schitov, a young parliamentarian from Mr Putin’s United Russia party, wrote on his blog yesterday that the pro-Putin women were all very attractive. “Why do we never see successful, pretty girls in the opposition?” he asked.

Woman accused of groping TSA agent at Phoenix airport

Flier allegedly grabbed the breast of a security agent at an airport checkpoint

msnbc.com | Jul 17, 2011

Yukari Mihamae, 61, is seen in this undated booking photo in Phoenix provided by the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office. Authorities say the Colorado woman who allegedly groped a female Transportation Security Administration agent at Phoenix's international airport on Thursday, July 14, 2011. AP/Maricopa County Sheriff's Office

PHOENIX — Authorities say a Colorado woman who allegedly groped a female Transportation Security Administration agent at Phoenix’s international airport is facing a felony count of sexual abuse.

Phoenix police say 61-year-old Yukari Mihamae is accused of grabbing the left breast of the unidentified TSA agent Thursday at an airport checkpoint.

TSA spokesperson Kawika Riley confirmed the altercation to msnbc.com in a statement: “On July 14 at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport, local law enforcement arrested a passenger for assaulting a TSA officer during the screening process.”

TSA staff say Mihamae refused to be go through passenger screening and became argumentative before she squeezed and twisted the agent’s breast with both hands.

Police were called and say Mihamae admitted grabbing the TSA agent and continued to argue with officers before she was arrested.

Maricopa County jail officials say Mihamae was released from custody Friday. They couldn’t immediately provide any information about her case status.

Phoenix TV station KSAZ says Mihamae lives in Longmont, Colo., and is self-employed.

Members of Parliament troubled by “revolving door” between the police and News International


Metropolitan Police assistant commissioner John Yates appears before a parliamentary hearing into phone hacking in London on Tuesday. Reuters Tv  /  Reuters

Metro police and media wind up sharing the goal of containing the investigation

MSNBC | Jul 17, 2011

Stain from tabloids rubs off on cozy Scotland Yard

By Don Van Natta Jr.

LONDON — For nearly four years they lay piled in a Scotland Yard evidence room, six overstuffed plastic bags gathering dust and little else.

Inside was a treasure-trove of evidence: 11,000 pages of handwritten notes listing nearly 4,000 celebrities, politicians, sports stars, police officials and crime victims whose phones may have been hacked by The News of the World, a now defunct British tabloid newspaper.

Yet from August 2006, when the items were seized, until the autumn of 2010, no one at the Metropolitan Police Service, commonly referred to as Scotland Yard, bothered to sort through all the material and catalog every page, said former and current senior police officials.

During that same time, senior Scotland Yard officials assured Parliament, judges, lawyers, potential hacking victims, the news media and the public that there was no evidence of widespread hacking by the tabloid. They steadfastly maintained that their original inquiry, which led to the conviction of one reporter and one private investigator, had put an end to what they called an isolated incident.

After the past week, that assertion has been reduced to tatters, torn apart by a spectacular avalanche of contradictory evidence, admissions by News International executives that hacking was more widespread, and a reversal by police officials who now admit to mishandling the case.

Assistant Commissioner John Yates of the Metropolitan Police Service publicly acknowledged that he had not actually gone through the evidence. “I’m not going to go down and look at bin bags,” Mr. Yates said, using the British term for trash bags.

At best, former Scotland Yard senior officers acknowledged in interviews, the police have been lazy, incompetent and too cozy with the people they should have regarded as suspects. At worst, they said, some officers might be guilty of crimes themselves.

“It’s embarrassing, and it’s tragic,” said a retired Scotland Yard veteran. “This has badly damaged the reputation of a really good investigative organization. And there is a major crisis now in the leadership of the Yard.”

The testimony and evidence that emerged last week, as well as interviews with current and former officials, indicate that the police agency and News International, the British subsidiary of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corporation and the publisher of The News of the World, became so intertwined that they wound up sharing the goal of containing the investigation.

Members of Parliament said in interviews that they were troubled by a “revolving door” between the police and News International, which included a former top editor at The News of the World at the time of the hacking who went on to work as a media strategist for Scotland Yard.

On Friday, The New York Times learned that the former editor, Neil Wallis, was reporting back to News International while he was working for the police on the hacking case.

Executives and others at the company also enjoyed close social ties to Scotland Yard’s top officials. Since the hacking scandal began in 2006, Mr. Yates and others regularly dined with editors from News International papers, records show. Sir Paul Stephenson, the police commissioner, met for meals 18 times with company executives and editors during the investigation, including on eight occasions with Mr. Wallis while he was still working at The News of the World.

Senior police officials declined several requests to be interviewed for this article.

The police have continually asserted that the original investigation was limited because the counterterrorism unit, which was in charge of the case, was preoccupied with more pressing demands. At the parliamentary committee hearing last week, the three officials said they were working on 70 terrorist investigations.

Yet the Metropolitan Police unit that deals with special crimes, and which had more resources and time available, could have taken over the case, said four former senior investigators. One said it was “utter nonsense” to argue that the department did not have enough resources.

Another senior investigator said officials saw the inquiry as being in “safe hands” at the counterterrorism unit.

Interviews with current and former officials show that instead of examining all the evidence, investigators primarily limited their inquiry to 36 names that the private investigator, Glenn Mulcaire, mentioned in one list.

As a result, Scotland Yard notified only a small number of the people whose phones were hacked by The News of the World. Other people who suspected foul play had to approach the police to see if their names were in Mr. Mulcaire’s files.

“It’s one thing to decide not to investigate,” said Jeremy Reed, one of the lawyers who represents numerous phone-hacking victims. “But it’s quite another thing not to tell the victims. That’s just mind-blowing.”

Among the possible victims was former Prime Minister Gordon Brown, who asked the police last year to look into suspicions that his phones were hacked. In response, Scotland Yard sent him a form letter saying it was unclear whether the tabloid had eavesdropped on his conversations, people with knowledge of the request said.

The police assigned a new team to the hacking allegations in September after The New York Times published a magazine article that showed that the practice was far more widespread and which raised questions about Scotland Yard’s handling of the case.

Shortly after, the police finally reopened those “bin bags.” Now, the police are enduring the painstaking and humiliating exercise of notifying nearly 4,000 angry people listed in the documents that they may have been targets of what now appears to be industrial-strength hacking by The News of the World. The chore is likely to take years.

A series of inquiries

Scotland Yard’s new inquiry, dubbed Operation Weeting, has led to the arrests of a total of nine reporters and editors, with more expected. And the police have opened another inquiry into allegations that some officers were paid for confidential information by reporters at The News of the World and elsewhere.

The Metropolitan Police itself is now the subject of a judicial inquiry into what went wrong with their initial case, as well as into the ties between the department’s top officers and executives and reporters for News International.

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3 girls busted for illegal lemonade stand

‘We were not aware of how the lemonade was made, who made the lemonade, of what the lemonade was made with,’ says police chief in Midway, Ga.

msnbc.com | Jul 17, 2011

Three girls trying to raise money to go to a waterpark thought that a lemonade stand would do the trick. But then they met the long arm of the law — their local police chief.

The girls had started up their stand in Midway, Ga., when Police Chief Kelly Morningstar and a deputy drove by.

“They told us to shut it down,” 10-year-old Skylar Roberts was quoted as saying by The Coastal Source news website.

“It’s kind of crazy that we couldn’t sell lemonade,” added 14-year-old Casity Dixon. “It was fun, but we had to listen to the cops and shut it down.”

Morningstar defended his action and received the support of Midway’s mayor. “We had told them, ‘We understand you guys are young, but still, you’re breaking the law, and we can’t let you do it anymore,'” Morningstar said. “The law is the law, and we have to be consistent with how we enforce the laws.”

That city law requires a business and food permits ($50 a day), even if the stand was at the home of one of the girls.

Health issues were also a concern, Morningstar said. “We were not aware of how the lemonade was made, who made the lemonade, of what the lemonade was made with, so we acted accordingly by city ordinance,” he said.

News of the bust caused an outpouring of local support for the trio — and The Coastal Source said it had given the girls tickets to the waterpark.