Monthly Archives: June 2012

Chinese couple forced to get abortion report further harassment

USA TODAY | Jun 27, 2012

By Calum MacLeod


China suspended three officials and apologized to a woman who was forced to undergo an abortion seven months into her pregnancy in a case that sparked a public uproar.

BEIJING – A couple forced into an abortion for not paying the fine for an extra child say they are being tormented by Chinese authorities despite the punishment of seven officials connected to the case.

“Over 10 people here watch us 24 hours a day,” said Deng Jicai, who is caring for her sister-in-law Feng Jianmei in the Zengjia township hospital where the abortion took place.

Her brother and Feng’s husband, Deng Jiyuan, telephoned Tuesday to report he was safe in another town after a beating he took in their home province of Shaanxi, where townspeople held a protest march Sunday against the family.

Marchers accused the family of being “traitors” for complaining to foreign news media that Feng was forced into a car June 2 by authorities, taken to a hospital and given drugs to induce labor and end her pregnancy at seven months.

Photos posted on the Internet of Feng lying in her hospital bed with her dead baby daughter by her side sparked unusual and widespread anger in a nation long accustomed to both voluntary and forced abortions. Feng and her husband, who have a 5-year-old daughter, were unable to pay in time the fine for having a second child.

Seven Chinese officials have been punished, including two firings, in connection with the incident, the state-run Xinhua News Agency reported Tuesday. While the Chinese government remains committed to controlling family sizes, an online survey on Tencent QQ, a popular microblog, found almost 83% of respondents considered family planning policy “inhumane” and said it should be abolished.

Ankang city authorities, in charge of Zengjia township, said their investigation showed that Feng’s late-term, forced abortion was a “rule-violating responsibility incident,” prompting disciplinary measures such as “records of demerit” for the hospital dean, Xinhua reported.

The result of the investigation angered some Chinese.

Yang Zhizhu, a law professor fired for having a second child, complained that the announcement said nothing about whether criminal procedures will be initiated against any of the authorities involved.

“What’s worse, the reason for the punishment is late-term abortion, but they didn’t say that forced, late-term abortion is not right,” he wrote.

Beijing-based rights lawyer Zhang Kai said he was certain the protests against the family have been organized by the local communist authorities.

“The aim is to scare people and put pressure” on the family, said Zhang, who met with Deng Jiyuan. Chinese society “must change from the current ‘stability maintenance’ model to a rule of law model. We should not try to cover up one mistake with another.”

Social stability is a key performance measure for officials, who react strongly when they’ve been embarrassed, said Sarah Schafer, a Hong Kong-based China researcher for Amnesty International.

“If it’s true that local officials are still punishing this family, that is horrendous and inexcusable,” she said. “The pressure to meet population quotas must stop.”

Aleister Crowley: Torquay’s Warlock and James Bond’s arch-enemy

TORQUAY resident Aleister Crowley (1875 –1947) was a mystic and magician, and the founder of the religious philosophy of Thelema.

Local historian Dr Kevin Dixon takes a look at the truth and the myth about this extraordinary character.

This is SouthDevon | Jun 26, 2012

Also known as Frater Perdurabo and the Great Beast, Crowley is known today for his mostly self-published magical writings and is recognised as one of the most influential occultists of all time.

Seeing himself “in revolt against the moral and religious values” of his time, Crowley proclaimed that he was a bisexual drug ‘fiend’. He took the motto ‘Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law’. However, this dedication to excess left a series of deeply damaged women and men its wake.

As a consequence, he gained widespread notoriety during his lifetime, and was denounced in the Edwardian popular press as “the wickedest man in the world.”

Crowley has remained an influential figure, and a BBC poll in 2002 described him as being the seventy-third greatest Briton of all time.

References to him can be found in the works of numerous writers and filmmakers. His reputation particularly appeals to musicians. Jim Morrison and Ozzy Osbourne have written songs about Crowley. Led Zeppelin’s guitarist Jimmy Page took his interest in the occult to the extent of buying Crowley’s Scottish mansion, Boleskine House, and he owned a large collection of Crowley memorabilia.

Crowley is in the back row on the famous cover of the Beatles’ 1967 album, ‘Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band’. The inclusion of the world’s most notorious magician led some American Christian evangelicals to condemn the Beatles as Satanists.

Aleister Crowley occult career began in Torquay.

In 1891, he lost his virginity at the age of 15 to a young actress in the town. He later wrote:

“The nightmare world of Christianity vanished at the dawn. I fell in with a girl of the theatre in the first 10 days at Torquay, and at that touch of human love the detestable mysteries of sex were transformed into joy and beauty. The obsession of sin fell from my shoulders into the sea of oblivion. I had been almost overwhelmed by the appalling responsibility of ensuring my own damnation and helping others to escape from Jesus. I found that the world was, after all, full of delightful damned souls.”

In 1917 Crowley referred to this encounter in a short novel ‘Not the Life of Sir Roger Bloxham’:

“’Twas at Torquay in Devon, land of stream and cream…, merry maids and proper men, tall fellows and bold… and of cider stronger and sweeter than your Norman can make for all his cunning; and this girl was a play-actress, rosy as the apples, and white as the cream, and soft as the air, and high-spirited as the folk, of that enchanted dukedom…”

Yet, at the time, when his horrified mother learned of his loss of innocence she condemned her teenage son as the ‘Beast’. This was the title Crowley was to adopt as he went on to provoke and outrage Christian society.

Later in his life, he returned to Torquay, staying first at the Grand and then in a house in Barton. Hopefully, by this time, he had given up trying to raise demons.

This is where Crowley’s story gets even stranger.

While he was living in Torquay during the War, Crowley was reputedly visited by British Intelligence. They wanted his advice on how to deal with Hitler’s Deputy Rudolf Hess.

On the eve of war with the Soviet Union, Hess had flown solo to Scotland in an attempt to negotiate peace with Britain, but instead was arrested.

British Intelligence knew that Hess was interested in the occult and during the Nazi’s initial interrogation, they tracked Crowley down to his home in Great Hill Road in order to ask his advice.

The elderly man who called himself ‘the Great Beast 666’ was living alone and writing patriotic poetry to encourage the war effort.

Crowley had written to the director of Naval Intelligence, Ian Fleming, offering his help:

“Sir: If it is true that Herr Hess is much influenced by astrology and Magick, my services might be of use to the Department in case he should not be willing to do what you wish.”

Crowley’s offer of joining the interrogation team wasn’t taken up. Yet, he did also suggest that the RAF should drop ‘occult literature’, written by himself, on the Germans as a way of confusing and demoralising the enemy.

Le Chiffre played by Orson Welles

In 1952, the same Ian Fleming was writing his first novel entitled ‘Casino Royale’. He wanted an arch-villain to rival his new hero, James Bond. The ‘wickedest man in the world’ was an ideal embodiment of intelligent evil. Hence, Aleister Crowley became the model for the Le Chiffre character.

As well as Le Chiffre in Casino Royale, a later Bond super-villain was supposedly inspired by Crowley.

This was Ernst Stavro Blofeld in the sixth Bond movie ‘On Her Majesty’s Secret Service’ (1969), played by Telly Savalas.

It’s suggested that Crowley’s demand that he should be addressed by an aristocratic title he had invented (‘Sir Crowley’), was the inspiration for one of the major plot points in OHMSS. This was when Blofeld threatens to cause mass destruction if his coat of arms isn’t recognised.

Crowley died in Hastings in 1947 at the age of 72. The cause of death was given as a respiratory infection. He had become addicted to heroin after being prescribed morphine for his asthma and bronchitis many years earlier.

Among some occultists, the name Aleister Crowley can still evoke reverence. Variants of his Magical Order and his Magick are still practiced throughout the world. Others just see him as a self-publicist, an exploiter of vulnerable men and women and a fraud.

Google vows full service to Israeli Mossad spy agency

Chief executives of the search engine, Google, vowed to render full service to the Mossad spy agency.

abna.ir | Jun 27, 2012

(Ahlul Bayt News Agency) – Chief executives of the search engine, Google, vowed in a recent meeting with Israeli prime minister to render full service to the Mossad spy agency.

“Investment in Israel was among the best decisions ever made by Google,” Google chief executive Eric Schmidt said during the meeting with Netanyahu.

During the meeting, Netanyahu gave Schmidt a sketch which showed the Israeli flag hoisting above Google’s emblem.

Western media reports had also earlier revealed that Google renders continued and special services to several spying agencies, including the CIA.

Traveler: TSA agent spilled grandfather’s ashes and laughed about it

TSA is investigating traveler’s complaint about agent opening and spilling ashes at Orlando airport checkpoint.

Orlando Sentinel | Jun 27, 2012

By Henry Pierson Curtis

ORLANDO, Fla. — John Gross remembers frantically trying to scoop up his grandfather’s ashes and wondering why the Orlando TSA agent who spilled them was laughing.

Moments earlier, Gross’s carry-on bag had passed through an X-ray machine at Orlando International Airport when he said he heard someone call out, “Bag check.”

It was about 7:25 a.m. June 19 and he was booked on an 8 a.m. United Express connecting flight to Newark and then home to Indianapolis with a small glass jar of his grandfather Mario “Mark” Marcaletti’s cremated remains.

But that’s when he said a female Transportation Security Administration agent wearing blue latex gloves opened his bag, twisted open the jar labeled, “Human Remains,” and accidentally spilled at least a quarter of its contents.

“I thought it was routine at first and then I thought, ‘What the hell was she doing this for?'” Gross said Tuesday in a telephone interview with The Orlando Sentinel. “I got upset. She was laughing right at me — not a chuckle — she was laughing.”

Sari Koshetz, a TSA spokeswoman in Miami, said the agency is investigating the incident to find out what happened.

TSA Agent Uses Her Hands To Sift Through Human Ashes

“We have been unable to reach the family to learn more about their perspective on the incident, however, our initial review concluded that the circumstances as described in some reports are inconsistent with what we believe transpired,” Koshetz wrote in a later email to the Sentinel.

TSA policy permits passengers to carry cremated remains aboard aircraft as long as the containers undergo X-ray inspection.

“We understand how painful losing a loved one is, and we respect anyone traveling with crematory remains,” states the cremated remains policy on the TSA website. “Out of respect to the deceased and their family and friends, under no circumstances will an officer open the container even if the passenger requests this to be done.”

Dropping to the floor after the spill, Gross said he reached for all the bigger pieces of remains but there was no way to collect everything without a dustpan and broom.

The TSA agent kept laughing without offering help, he said. And passengers waiting to get their bags were stalled behind him as he spent 10 to 15 seconds on his knees grabbing what he could, Gross said.

“I didn’t want to cause a scene because I didn’t want them to throw me off my flight or put me on the no-fly list,” said Gross, 30, a restaurant manager. “It didn’t really hit me until I got on the plane.”

During a three-hour layover in Newark, Gross said he spoke to TSA officials there who were apologetic about what happened and gave him a telephone number for a TSA manager at OIA. During a brief telephone call with TSA’s Orlando office, Gross said a woman told him she would speak to TSA agents about how to handle human remains.

“She basically hung up on me because there was nothing she could do,” Gross said. “I don’t want anything. All I want is an apology. And I want to understand where they get off treating people like this.”

Gross had spent two weeks in Central Florida visiting his uncle and aunt, Walt and Nancy Gross of Deltona, who gave him the jar of ashes. It’s a close family that descended from his grandfather, a Sicilian immigrant who moved to Indiana, took a job with the Penn Central Railroad and became a Chicago Cubs fan until his death at 91 in 2002.

“My grandpa I’m sure is up there in heaven laughing about this. I’m wondering who stepped in his ashes and where they are now. Maybe a little bit made it to Cubs’ stadium,” Gross said. “You’ve got to laugh about it but when you get down to it, it’s not a laughing matter.”

As downsizing British families feel the pain of recession the Queen gets a big pay raise


At a time when Britain is in recession and many families are feeling the pinch of higher household costs and taxes, the Queen’s allowance will rise to 36 million pounds from 30 million pounds

Britain’s Queen Elizabeth gets bumper pay rise

Reuters | Jun 21, 2012

By Brenda Goh

LONDON – Britain’s Queen Elizabeth has another reason to be cheerful in her Diamond Jubilee year – her annual pay is about to jump by 20 percent to 36 million pounds.

Her property holdings, known as the Crown Estate, posted a record profit of 240.2 million pounds, a net rise of 4 percent in the year through March 2012 largely due to strong tenant demand for its shops in the upmarket Regent Street and St James’s districts of London.

At a time when Britain is in recession and many families are feeling the pinch of higher household costs and taxes, the Queen’s allowance will rise to 36 million pounds from 30 million pounds, the level at which it was frozen in October 2010 under new laws which peg her pay to the estate’s profits.

“It’s a great set of results and I’m sure everyone’s going to be happy,” Crown Estate Chief Executive Alison Nimmo said.

The 85-year-old queen celebrated her 60th year on the throne this month with a 1,000-vessel flotilla on London’s River Thames and nationwide street parties.

She has been paid by taxpayers through an allowance set by Parliament and via other government grants since King George III ceded all property profits to the Treasury in 1760.

The Crown Estate pays all of its profit to the Treasury, or finance ministry. Under new laws that come into effect in 2013-14, the monarch’s pay is calculated as 15 percent of the estate’s profits from two years prior.

The changes were designed to ensure the queen’s pay would rise and fall with the health of the British economy, which this year entered its second recession since the start of the global financial crisis.

Used mainly to pay the Royal household’s staff as well as for items like laundry, stationery and official functions, her 2013-14 pay will be the highest since 2008 though still less than half of her 1991 pay of 77.3 million pounds.

The Crown Estate, which owns a mix of wind farms, retail parks and most of Britain’s seabed in addition to its central London properties, outperformed the industry’s I n vestment Property Databank (IPD) be n chmark index due to strong international interest in the London property market and the country’s growing dependency on renewable energy.

The value of its property portfolio rose 7.4 percent to 7.6 billion pounds from the previous year, while the total return, which includes rental income, was 16.8 percent, outperforming the IPD index by 10.4 percentage points.

Its London projects include the 500 million pound regeneration of the St James’s district, where it will redevelop almost 300,000 square feet of new shops, offices and homes.

Google and Apple using planes with military cameras to film you sunbathing in your back yard


The issue of Street View-style maps is already controversial thanks to Google’s alleged data harvesting tactics

Software giants will use military-grade cameras to take powerful satellite images

Beware the spy in the sky: After those Street View snoopers, Google and Apple use planes that can film you sunbathing in your back garden

Daily Mail | Jun 10, 2012

By Vanessa Allen

Spy planes able to photograph sunbathers in their back gardens are being deployed by Google and Apple.

The U.S. technology giants are racing to produce aerial maps so detailed they can show up objects just four inches wide.

But campaigners say the technology is a sinister development that brings the surveillance society a step closer.

Google admits it has already sent planes over cities while Apple has acquired a firm using spy-in-the-sky technology that has been tested on at least 20 locations, including London.

Apple’s military-grade cameras are understood to be so powerful they could potentially see into homes through skylights and windows. The technology is similar to that used by intelligence agencies in identifying terrorist targets in Afghanistan.

Google will use its spy planes to help create 3D maps with much more detail than its satellite-derived Google Earth images.

Nick Pickles, director of Big Brother Watch, warned that privacy risked being sacrificed in a commercial ‘race to the bottom’.

‘The next generation of maps is taking us over the garden fence,’ he warned. ‘You won’t be able to sunbathe in your garden without worrying about an Apple or Google plane buzzing overhead taking pictures.’

He said householders should be asked for their consent before images of their homes go online. Apple is expected to unveil its new mapping applications for its iPhone and other devices today – along with privacy safeguards. Its 3D maps will reportedly show for the first time the sides of tall buildings, such as the Big Ben clock tower.

Google expects by the end of the year to have 3D coverage of towns and cities with a combined population of 300million. It has not revealed any locations so far.

Current 3D mapping technology relies on aerial images taken at a much lower resolution than the technology Apple is thought to be using. This means that when users ‘zoom in’, details tend to be lost because of the poor image quality.

Google ran into trouble when it emerged that its Street View cars, which gathered ground-level panoramic photographs for Google Maps, had also harvested personal data from household wifi networks.

Emails, text messages, photographs and documents were taken from unsecured wifi networks all around Britain.

Google claimed it was a mistake even though a senior manager was warned as early as 2007 that the extra information was being captured. Around one in four home networks is thought to be unsecured because they lack password protection.

Little has been revealed about the technology involved in the spy planes used to capture the aerial images.

But they are thought to be able to photograph around 40 square miles every hour, suggesting they would be flying too quickly and at too great a height to access domestic wifi networks.
Like Google Maps, the resulting images would not be streamed live to computers but would provide a snapshot image of the moment the camera passed by.

Google pixellates faces and car number plates but faced criticism after its service showed one recognisable man leaving a sex shop and another being sick in the street.

Amie Stepanovich, of the Electronic Privacy Information Centre in America, said she believed Apple and Google would be forced to blur out homes in the same way Street View pixellates faces.

She said: ‘With satellite images, privacy is built in because you can’t zoom down into a garden. Homeowners need to be asked to opt in to show their property in high definition – otherwise it should be blurred out.’

Apple has previously used Google for its mapping services but last year it emerged it had bought C3 Technologies, a 3D mapping company that uses technology developed by Saab AB, the aerospace and defence company.

At the time C3 had already mapped 20 cities and it is believed to have added more with Apple’s backing. Its photographs have been shot from 1,600ft and one C3 executive described it as ‘Google on steroids’.

There are already 3D maps available online for most big city centres, but the images are often low resolution, meaning they are of little use for navigation and users cannot zoom in on detail.
Critics have argued that Apple and Google will face a backlash if they offer detailed 3D mapping of residential areas in suburbs and rural locations.

Son of ‘God’s banker’ Roberto Calvi: Mafiosi who hanged father from Blackfriars Bridge still at large in London


Family moment: Italian financier Roberto Calvi (right) and his son Carlo in a picture taken by Carlo’s sister Anna in 1982, the year Roberto was found hanging under Blackfriars Bridge in London

Son of ‘God’s banker’ Roberto Calvi talks 30 years after father’s death

Carlo Calvi, 58, has spent £15million conducting his own investigation

Daily Mail | May 26, 2012

By Claudia Joseph

It was a very public death.

In the grey light of dawn, the body of a man was found hanging from scaffolding underneath Blackfriars Bridge in Central London, his feet dangling in the water.

Roberto Calvi was found hanging from scaffolding on Blackfriars Bridge, his pockets loaded with bricks. Both the Calvi and Sindona cases remain unsolved.

He was wearing an expensive Italian suit and his pockets  were weighted with bricks and stuffed with cash.

Initially police believed that Italian financier Roberto Calvi, known as ‘God’s banker’ because of his close financial ties with the Vatican, had committed suicide.

But the dead man’s son, Carlo Calvi, commissioned an independent forensic report, which concluded in October 2002 that he had been murdered.

In 2005, Italian prosecutors brought murder charges against five suspects but all were acquitted after the subsequent trial in Rome.

Now, 30 years after his father was found dead, Carlo remains convinced that he was murdered and wants police to reopen the case.

Carlo believes that up to a dozen men from the Italian underworld were involved in the murder – and claims many are still at large in London.

‘A long time has passed since my father’s murder on June 18, 1982,’ he said. ‘It is not unrealistic to believe that there are individuals involved in his death still alive. I want the City of London Police to pursue these individuals and put them where they belong. It is a matter of public interest. These people are still operating in London. We should all know who they are and what they are doing.’

Carlo, aged 58 and himself a former banker, has dedicated his life to seeking justice for his father, who was the chairman of Italy’s second-largest bank, Banco Ambrosiano. The bank subsequently collapsed with debts  of half a billion pounds amid dark rumours of laundered Mafia drug money, a link with the clandestine ‘P2’ Masonic lodge and secret political slush funds.

Now living in Montreal, Canada, Carlo spends his time travelling between his home and London, New York and Milan – sifting through  evidence, meeting secretive contacts willing to talk about Italian organised crime and poring over the transcripts of Mafia trials.

His obsession with finding the men involved in his father’s murder has come at a price – both financial and personal. He has spent £15 million on fees for lawyers, private detectives and other experts in an attempt to identify the guilty.

And his marriage to Marie Josee, mother of his two sons, Roberto, 18, and Nicola, 16, broke up in 2000. He has also not seen his sister Anna, 55, a lecturer at Warwick University, since their mother’s death from Parkinson’s disease in 2006.

‘There’s no doubt I have fixated on the case,’ he said. ‘I’m sure that played a part in my divorce and it has affected my relationship with my sister. She doesn’t necessarily agree with the things I have done.’

Carlo was a 28-year-old post-graduate student at Washington’s Georgetown University when he recieved the telephone call that would change his life. His mother Clara, then 60, and sister Anna, 25, were staying with him in Washington, having been warned by his father that their lives were in danger.

‘My mother had been living with me in America for about six weeks because my father feared for her safety,’ he recalled. ‘My sister arrived the day before he died. We were awoken by the telephone in the middle of the night when my uncle Luciano, my mother’s brother, called from Bologna to say that he had heard the news on the radio.

‘He spoke to my mother who had a complete breakdown. She was devastated. We had to call a doctor. I remember telling my uncle that he could have been more careful with his words. I think he was a little too direct.’

Within hours the family had been escorted by American police to a secret apartment in the Watergate complex, famous for the break-in that brought about the fall of President Richard Nixon. They spent the next few weeks under police guard before returning to Carlo’s home.

‘My mother never recovered from my father’s death,’ said Carlo. ‘She and my father had always dreamed  of living near Lake Como. They were very close and she remained very attached to her dreams.

‘The following year, she suffered  the first symptoms of Parkinson’s. I don’t think she got it as a direct result of my father’s murder – but surely it doesn’t help if you have lived through such a shock?’

Carlo’s quest for the truth began a month after his father’s death when  a London inquest recorded a verdict of suicide. It was hardly a likely explanation. Six days before his death, Calvi had shaved off his moustache and skipped bail in Italy pending an appeal against a four-year suspended prison sentence for illegally transferring £18 million out of the country.

Fearing for his life, the 62-year-old banker chartered a private plane and fled to Britain on a false passport with Sardinian business tycoon Silvano  Vittor, a long-term associate who assumed the role of bodyguard. He was taken to a safe house in Chelsea Cloisters, West London – believed to have been organised by another Sardinian businessman, Flavio Carboni.

Calvi had already written to Pope John Paul II  warning him of the imminent collapse of Banco Ambrosiano, saying that it would ‘provoke a catastrophe of unimaginable proportions in which the Church will suffer the gravest damage’.

Calvi also had close links to the Mafia, the Neapolitan Camorra – a Mafia-like criminal organisation based in Naples – and the Masonic lodge P2. The latter was described by Calvi’s former Banco Ambrosiano mentor, Sicilian Michele  Sindona, as a ‘state within a state’ because of its powerful members, including former Italian Prime  Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

Carlo refused to accept the 1982 inquest’s suicide verdict. He hired one of Britain’s best-known barristers, George Carman QC, to represent the family at a second hearing, which recorded an open verdict. Still not satisfied, he demanded that his father’s body was exhumed.

Carlo then commissioned the  independent forensic report, which concluded in October 2002 that his father had been murdered as the injuries to his neck were inconsistent with hanging, there was no trace of rust and paint on his shoes from the scaffolding and he had not touched the bricks in his pockets.

In 2005, Vittor and Carboni were accused of killing Calvi. But the duo and three others – Mafia financier Pippo Calò, businessman Ernesto Diotallevi and Carboni’s girlfriend Manuela  Kleinszig – were acquitted 20 months later.

Another name linked to Calvi’s murder was Mafia ‘supergrass’ Francesco Di Carlo, known as ‘Frankie the Strangler’.

According to Di Carlo, the killers were Vincenzo Casillo and Sergio Vaccari of the Naples Camorra.

‘Calvi was naming names,’ said Di Carlo. ‘No one had any trust in him any more. He owed a lot of money. His friends had all distanced themselves. Everyone wanted to get rid of him. I was in Rome and received a phone call from a friend in Sicily telling me that a certain high- ranking Mafia member had just been killed.

‘I will never forget the date because of this: it was June 16, 1982 – two days before Calvi was murdered. The friend told me that Pippo Calò was trying to get hold of me because he needed me to do something for him,’ Di Carlo claims.

‘When I finally spoke to Pippo, he told me not to worry, that the problem had been taken care of.

‘That’s a code we use in the Cosa Nostra. We never talk about killing someone. We say they have been taken care of.’


Determined: Carlo Calvi (pictured) has dedicated his life to seeking justice for his father

Carlo Calvi believes that the supergrass is telling the truth. He agrees with Di Carlo that his father’s killers were Casillo – the second-in-command of the Camorra, who was  murdered by a car bomb in Rome in 1983 – and his sidekick Vaccari, who was stabbed to death three months after Calvi’s murder.

Vaccari was also a former tenant of Calvi’s last known home, the rented flat at Chelsea Cloisters.

Carlo points out that both his father and Casillo had business cards belonging to Alvaro Giardili, a Camorra associate, in their possession when they died.

‘I’m not suggesting Alvaro Giardili was involved, but he definitely  connects to some of the individuals involved in the case,’ Carlo said. ‘When my father died, he had Giardili’s business card in his wallet.

‘One of the first people to ring us when we returned to the house after my father died was Giardili. In general, I consider Di Carlo a reliable witness. But I am more interested in what he has to say about the social network of the Italian underground in London during the Eighties.’

It is that underground movement that Carlo is now hoping will be exposed – even if his own safety  is jeopardised.

Calling for a third inquest, he said: ‘The police have already admitted it was murder but I would like to see the case reviewed in open court and the remaining defendants in their jurisdiction pursued.

‘When I lived in Italy I had bodyguards but now I have to rely on my own judgment and instinct.

‘There have been instances when I have been concerned for my safety but I try not to be confrontational and protect myself.

‘If the worst happens, I am not the only person who has this information. I will not rest until I find out the truth about my father’s death.’