Category Archives: Artificial Scarcity

South Carolina scientist works to grow meat in lab

Reuters | Jan 30, 2011

By Harriet McLeod Harriet Mcleod

CHARLESTON, South Carolina (Reuters) – In a small laboratory on an upper floor of the basic science building at the Medical University of South Carolina, Vladimir Mironov, M.D., Ph.D., has been working for a decade to grow meat.

A developmental biologist and tissue engineer, Dr. Mironov, 56, is one of only a few scientists worldwide involved in bioengineering “cultured” meat.

It’s a product he believes could help solve future global food crises resulting from shrinking amounts of land available for growing meat the old-fashioned way … on the hoof.

Growth of “in-vitro” or cultured meat is also under way in the Netherlands, Mironov told Reuters in an interview, but in the United States, it is science in search of funding and demand.

The new National Institute of Food and Agriculture, part of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, won’t fund it, the National Institutes of Health won’t fund it, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration funded it only briefly, Mironov said.

“It’s classic disruptive technology,” Mironov said. “Bringing any new technology on the market, average, costs $1 billion. We don’t even have $1 million.”

Director of the Advanced Tissue Biofabrication Center in the Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology at the medical university, Mironov now primarily conducts research on tissue engineering, or growing, of human organs.

“There’s a yuck factor when people find out meat is grown in a lab. They don’t like to associate technology with food,” said Nicholas Genovese, 32, a visiting scholar in cancer cell biology working under a People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals three-year grant to run Dr. Mironov’s meat-growing lab.

“But there are a lot of products that we eat today that are considered natural that are produced in a similar manner,” Genovese said.

“There’s yogurt, which is cultured yeast. You have wine production and beer production. These were not produced in laboratories. Society has accepted these products.”

If wine is produced in winery, beer in a brewery and bread in a bakery, where are you going to grow cultured meat?

In a “carnery,” if Mironov has his way. That is the name he has given future production facilities.

He envisions football field-sized buildings filled with large bioreactors, or bioreactors the size of a coffee machine in grocery stores, to manufacture what he calls “charlem” — “Charleston engineered meat.”

“It will be functional, natural, designed food,” Mironov said. “How do you want it to taste? You want a little bit of fat, you want pork, you want lamb? We design exactly what you want. We can design texture.

“I believe we can do it without genes. But there is no evidence that if you add genes the quality of food will somehow suffer. Genetically modified food is already normal practice and nobody dies.”

Dr. Mironov has taken myoblasts — embryonic cells that develop into muscle tissue — from turkey and bathed them in a nutrient bath of bovine serum on a scaffold made of chitosan (a common polymer found in nature) to grow animal skeletal muscle tissue. But how do you get that juicy, meaty quality?

Genovese said scientists want to add fat. And adding a vascular system so that interior cells can receive oxygen will enable the growth of steak, say, instead of just thin strips of muscle tissue.

Cultured meat could eventually become cheaper than what Genovese called the heavily subsidized production of farm meat, he said, and if the public accepts cultured meat, the future holds benefits.

“Thirty percent of the earth’s land surface area is associated with producing animal protein on farms,” Genovese said.

“Animals require between 3 and 8 pounds of nutrient to make 1 pound of meat. It’s fairly inefficient. Animals consume food and produce waste. Cultured meat doesn’t have a digestive system.

“Further out, if we have interplanetary exploration, people will need to produce food in space and you can’t take a cow with you.

“We have to look to these ideas in order to progress. Otherwise, we stay static. I mean, 15 years ago who could have imagined the iPhone?”

Cancun climate change summit: scientists call for rationing in developed world


‘The Second World War and the concept of rationing is something we need to seriously consider if we are to address the scale of the problem we face’ Photo: GETTY

Global warming is now such a serious threat to mankind that climate change experts are calling for Second World War-style rationing in rich countries to bring down carbon emissions.

Telegraph | Nov 29, 2010

By Louise Gray

In a series of papers published by the Royal Society, physicists and chemists from some of world’s most respected scientific institutions, including Oxford University and the Met Office, agreed that current plans to tackle global warming are not enough.

Unless emissions are reduced dramatically in the next ten years the world is set to see temperatures rise by more than 4C (7.2F) by as early as the 2060s, causing floods, droughts and mass migration.

As the world meets in Cancun, Mexico for the latest round of United Nations talks on climate change, the influential academics called for much tougher measures to cut carbon emissions.

In one paper Professor Kevin Anderson, Director of the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, said the only way to reduce global emissions enough, while allowing the poor nations to continue to grow, is to halt economic growth in the rich world over the next twenty years.

This would mean a drastic change in lifestyles for many people in countries like Britain as everyone will have to buy less ‘carbon intensive’ goods and services such as long haul flights and fuel hungry cars.

Prof Anderson admitted it “would not be easy” to persuade people to reduce their consumption of goods

He said politicians should consider a rationing system similar to the one introduced during the last “time of crisis” in the 1930s and 40s.

This could mean a limit on electricity so people are forced to turn the heating down, turn off the lights and replace old electrical goods like huge fridges with more efficient models. Food that has travelled from abroad may be limited and goods that require a lot of energy to manufacture.

“The Second World War and the concept of rationing is something we need to seriously consider if we are to address the scale of the problem we face,” he said.

Prof Anderson insisted that halting growth in the rich world does not necessarily mean a recession or a worse lifestyle, it just means making adjustments in everyday life such as using public transport and wearing a sweater rather than turning on the heating.

“I am not saying we have to go back to living in caves,” he said. “Our emissions were a lot less ten years ago and we got by ok then.”

The last round of talks in Copenhagen last year ended in a weak political accord to keep temperature rise below the dangerous tipping point of 2C(3.6F).

This time 194 countries are meeting again to try and make the deal legally binding and agree targets on cutting emissions.

At the moment efforts are focused on trying to get countries to cut emissions by 50 per cent by 2050 relative to 1990 levels.

But Dr Myles Allen, of Oxford University’s Department of Physics, said this might not be enough. He said that if emissions do not come down quick enough even a slight change in temperature will be too rapid for ecosystems to keep up. Also by measuring emissions relative to a particular baseline, rather than putting a limit on the total amount that can ever be pumped into the atmosphere, there is a danger that the limit is exceeded.

“Peak warming is determined by the total amount of carbon dioxide we release into the atmosphere, not the rate we release it in any given year,’ he said. “Dangerous climate change, however, also depends on how fast the planet is warming up, not just how hot it gets, and the maximum rate of warming does depend on the maximum emission rate. It’s not just how much we emit, but how fast we do so.”

Other papers published on ‘4C and beyond’ in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society A warned of rising sea levels, droughts in river basins and mass migrations.

BP’s evaporating oil slick leaves America without a villain

With the gush from the BP oil spill plugged for the past two weeks, experts are beginning to question whether it can really be called an environmental disaster at all, writes Alex Spillius.

Nature is taking its course, aided by a naval-size flotilla of skimming boats and some powerful chemical dispersants.

Telegraph | Jul 31, 2010

Alex Spillius – American Way

Published: So, the oil in the Gulf of Mexico is disappearing much more quickly than expected.

The sea’s warm surface and oil-munching bacteria have dissipated the slick to such an extent that a planeload of journalists had to fly for an hour before their pilot could find a patch of oil. His relief, according to one reporter on board, was comparable to the anxious captain of a tourist boat spotting a distant pod of dolphins.

It turns out that the playful sea mammals, like other creatures, suffered much less damage than was forecast. A grand total of three dead dolphins covered in oil have been recovered by wildlife rescue teams. The spill has so far killed less than one per cent of the number of birds claimed by the Exxon Valdez disaster in Alaska in 1989.

With the gush plugged for the past two weeks, experts are beginning to question whether the BP spill can really be called an environmental disaster at all.

Doubts remain about the long-term underwater affects of the oil on the ecosystem, but the greatest tragedy remains the 11 lives lost when BP’s Deepwater Horizon rig exploded on April 20, causing the well to rupture.

On Friday, the company’s new chief executive Bob Dudley announced that the clean-up operation could now begin to be scaled back. It was one of the American’s first public utterances since replacing Tony Hayward as chief executive.

In an earlier appearance before BP employees in Britain, Dudley praised his predecessor for having the decency to stand down “just when things are starting to go right”.

It was not something Dudley would dare to say in the United States, where Hayward, as he acknowledged last week, remains a villain.

There are understandable reasons for this.

His “I want my life back” remark was callous in its carelessness.

You also don’t compare the biggest oil leak in US history to a “drop in the ocean”, even though that has turned out to be more or less the case, when your company is responsible for dumping 60,000 gallons a day into the sea, and when it has probably been economical with the truth about the size of the outflow.

But Hayward’s pillorying revealed how the well-spoken scoundrel remains a latent British stereotype, one that is connected to the “don’t-forget-we-kicked-your-butts-in-1776” smirk that can easily greet a British visitor on July 4.

It was also a reminder that the primary purpose of a scapegoat is to deflect blame. Amid the anger at BP, there were very few in government, the environmental movement or the media prepared to acknowledge that the despoliation of the Gulf and of the Louisiana coast has been going on for decades.

Long, long ago the state – and its people and its elected representatives – embraced oil and all its hazards. Development of the industry was rampant, corrupt, poorly regulated and carried out with little regard to the delicate marshlands that everyone was so worried about once the BP well burst open.

The thirst for oil, and the jobs and revenues it brought, led to the construction of 4,000 offshore oil and gas platforms. Thousands of miles of pipeline and a complex of roads and canals contributed to the disappearance of more than 2,000 square miles of Louisiana coastline over the past century. Teams assessing the damage caused by BP to the wetlands found 350 acres of oily marshes, but the state was already losing many times that amount every year.

As the Washington Post’s energy correspondent put it, Louisiana had become a “Cajun sheikhdom”, with over-dependency on one commodity leading to underdevelopment in many areas.

That reliance explained why the major issue for locals during the spill was not the nationality of the BP’s CEO. They cared about prompt payment of compensation – and there are few complaints heard about that these days – and President Barack Obama’s moratorium on deep-water drilling, which was regarded as a mass job-deprivation programme.

The vilification of Hayward was a Washington affair and the onus is now on Washington to craft an energy policy that will exploit natural resources while offering better care for local environments and requiring stricter adherence to safety standards from the industry.

BP, having committed a colossal and tragic error, seems to be doing its part. It is now up to America’s politicians to do theirs.


‘Peak water’ could flush civilisation author claims

Early civilisations prospered by taming rivers, but as water gets scarce in some regions, populations rise and lifestyles remain the same, we might not be far from warring over water, writes SYLVIA THOMPSON

Irish Times | Jan 23, 2010

FORGET PEAK OIL. Forget climate change. Peak water is where it’s at, according to Scottish journalist and broadcaster, Alexander Bell, who has just written a fascinating book, Peak Water (Luath Press, Scotland).

“It’s the coming issue of our age,” says Bell. “Civilisation is thirsty. It has never stopped to think about what would happen if the water ran out.” And while Bell acknowledges tackling climate change is important, he firmly states peak water would have happened with or without it.

“You could say that it’s a re-framing of the climate change [issues] and what we are doing with the planet. With climate change, we’ve become conditioned to the idea of disaster but by focusing on water, you can’t say there is nothing you can do. Water is a precious resource that is running out in various parts of the world and even if it’s not running out in Ireland or Scotland, we will lose food, clothing and stability of the world order as we know it because of water shortages.”

Writing for the non-expert reader, Bell offers a fascinating journey through civilisations, charting how important access to water was in their growth and, in many cases, their demise. He brings us back to ancient civilisations in Persia, Egypt, China and Peru, with details of canal transport, aqueducts, dams and irrigation schemes. Bell argues that when humankind began to lose its connection to the river, we got the water to follow us rather than us following it.

“The triumph of the early empires is that they tame unpredictable flows but from about 1,000 BC on, civilisation begins to take the control of water for granted and something that has been magical becomes a given. It is still the source of power and the determinant to an empire’s success but the gradual process of burying water under the complexity of the state begins,” he writes.

This process, according to Bell, was evident in Greek and Roman civilisations where the source of food moved farther from the cities, and water became more associated with cleanliness than with basic survival.

“Two thousand years ago, places to wash in Rome were as common as coffee shops today,” he writes. “And a whole body of jurisprudence existed to govern the ownership and rights to water flow.” Some of the current problems with water shortages stem from our luxurious approach to water, particularly in places where there is very little. Bell is particularly fascinated by Dubai, which “has the highest water consumption per capita in the world. It sucks up water for construction, agriculture and industry. It gulps in the name of luxury and cleanliness,” he writes.

He also cites the excessive use of water in the US, particularly in places such as Las Vegas where there is very little. “In gated communities, huge structures look out over green lawns and rolling golf courses and artificial lakes. Never mind that the water for Las Vegas is piped from miles away – this is 20th century civilisation, where water follows man – no matter the lunacy of the destination.” And while he acknowledges that the Las Vegas city council now offers incentives for planting desert grass and fines for wasting water, Bell predicts that cities such as Las Vegas will die by ecocide.

The great rivers of the world are already running dry. The Colorado doesn’t make it to the Pacific Ocean for half the year. The rivers that made China, the Yellow and the Yangtze, also fail to reach the sea for stretches of the year. It’s the same story with the Nile and the Ganges. As Bell puts it, “the iconic rivers of our imagination are drying up. The rivers are the visible, potent symbols of our deluded belief in water control. With them come wetlands, flood plains, natural irrigation and the steady, if slow, replenishment of underground water reserves.”

Bell argues that while the great empires of the east used water to establish a consistent food supply, the northern countries used it “to lubricate the growth of capital.

“In the east, water control meant simple social structures of a ruling elite and a labouring class. In the north, water helped create a more complex hierarchy, based on wealth and skill. This liberal society found water could drive the mills that kick-started major industries. This created factories and the lure of urban living and higher wages to draw people from the countryside. It could move barges full of coal and cotton. Steam powered larger engines, pumps, trains and then ships.” And while Bell acknowledges that some of our current crises are caused by global warming, he argues that unsustainable water usage is a key reason the ways of the world have to change.

LIKE BELL, MANY writers have raised the point that when population growth in places such as India and China is coupled with the desire for a more western lifestyle, this puts further pressure on natural resources including water. This is where the idea of valuing water as a precious resource links right into the same issues raised by climate change.

In fact, the idea of an individual water footprint has already been raised. A water footprint encompasses the reality that we affect water beyond our borders when countries that have a short supply of water grow and make things that have a heavy demand on water.

Bell suggests that revaluing water across the globe would take a radical shift. He explains how, because water is growing scarce in traditional wheat-, rice- and maize-growing areas of the US, India and Pakistan, it should be possible that the wet north could replace production, in part.

He also suggests that the north European (and now North American) model of industrialised, liberal, capitalist society may be best suited to wet countries. Secondly, he suggests we are quite used to making naturally occurring materials such as coal or oil into assets, so why not water? There is already a price on water in some places but putting a price on water that changes people’s usage habits (both personal and agricultural) is a broader issue.

Bell says: “We should be the ones who build new houses with composting toilets and reed beds to clean the waste water. We should instigate rainwater collection on a large scale . . . We should ensure that more food is grown for local consumption. The wet world should grow vital food for the dry world.”

BELL ALSO BRINGS up the widely held belief that the next wars to be fought in the world will be over water. In fact, he states that such wars have already occurred in some places – for example, between Pakistan and India. And the investment bank Goldman Sacks has dubbed water the petroleum for the next century.

“With the Cold War over and the threat from mass nuclear deployment apparently gone, we have switched our fears to a water war,” he writes.

According to Bell, what both threats show is that we fear our capacity to self-destruct (many would argue that much of the rhetoric around climate change comes from the same place).

He adds: “the reality of changing our water use is colossal. It calls for a new kind of civilisation built on global co-operation. The penalty for not doing this will be widespread social chaos.”

The new enviro-guilt: water footprints

Now that you’ve figured out how to reduce your carbon impact, another global problem is emerging. Environmentalists see a future in which everyday items will be labelled with the amount of H{-2}0 required to produce them

Globe and Mail | Dec 11, 2009

by Zoe Cormier

Products labelled with their carbon footprints are slowly making their way into the marketplace – for example, Timberland Co., a U.S. footwear maker, has identified the environmental impact of many of its shoe lines.

But imagine buying an apple with this label: It took 68 litres of water to produce this fruit.

Water footprints may soon be coming to a store near you.

As global leaders scramble to reach a deal on climate change this week in Copenhagen, environmentalists are hoping a topic that isn’t on the agenda – water scarcity – will be the next big issue to capture the world’s attention. For the consumer, that means pointing out just how much water is needed to produce items we use every day.

“I think personally that water footprints are much more tangible for people than the concept of a carbon footprint – it’s amazing to see people’s reactions when they see that 25,000 litres of water go into making a pair of shoes,” says Karen Kun, co-founder of Waterlution, a Toronto-based non-profit organization for water education.

“People would respond very well to products being clearly labelled with their water footprint – consumers are crying out for mainstream products to have the right information so they can make their own choices.”

The movement to label water footprints saw its first victory this year when Finnish food conglomerate Raisio launched the first voluntary example – 101 litres of water for each 100 grams of its oat flakes breakfast cereal.

And over the past few years, about 60 large companies have signed on to the United Nations’ CEO Water Mandate, an informal pledge to lower their water footprints. They include Coca-Cola, Bayer, Cadbury, Dow Chemical, Heineken, Unilever and Siemens.

“All over the world, we consume products that don’t include the cost of the water, and this needs to be changed,” says Arjen Hoekstra, creator of the water footprint concept. Dr. Hoekstra is a professor at the University of Twente in the Netherlands and scientific director of the Water Footprint Network.

“This is why the concept of a water footprint is useful, to try and show the link between consumption and the creation of those products, and show the consumer’s responsibility for the waste.”

Some surprising statistics: A cup of coffee typically needs more than 140 litres of water to produce. For one kilogram of beef, it’s about 15,150 litres.

Food usually accounts for about 70 per cent of each person’s total footprint, but consumer products, such as jeans, cellphones and eyeshadow, require far more water per purchase. A cotton T-shirt soaks up 2,700 litres of water, a microchip needs 30 litres and a car requires more than 150,000 litres.

Of course, footprints can vary from product to product. Beef from cattle raised on soy will carry a different water footprint than meat from cattle fed on grain, and leather jackets made by different designers will vary from one another, which is why many environmentalists are calling for the development of a standardized label.

Dr. Hoekstra is wary of all the corporate interest in the water footprint: “They are all embracing the concept of the water footprint for the same reason they embraced the carbon footprint – because there is a lot of money to be made, not because they are serious about water conservation,” he says. “There has been a great deal of hype made over carbon footprints, and you will see the same thing happen with the water footprint as it moves up the political agenda.”

In fact, experts say climate change and water scarcity are inextricably linked: Higher temperatures and changing precipitation patterns – along with population growth, deforestation and diversion of water for dams, urbanization and industry – will mean that by 2025, more than two-thirds of the world’s population will have to deal with chronic water shortages, according to the UN World Water Assessment Program.

According to the UN, one-third of the world’s population currently suffers from water scarcity, when less than a decade ago it was thought the world would not reach that point until 2025.

Dr. Hoekstra says he hopes a labelling standard for the water footprint will avoid the mistakes made with carbon footprints, which use language that makes it easy “to confuse people and for vested interests to appear as though they are doing something substantial when it is the least effort they could make.”

For instance, carbon offsets have been fraught with problems: Any individual, company or country can claim to be “carbon-neutral” by purchasing offsets rather than implementing carbon-reducing strategies first. And not all offsets are created equal. They vary widely in quality and impact – investment in renewable-energy projects in developing nations are considered superior to tree-planting schemes, for example.

“Already we are hearing people talk about water offsets – because it’s cheaper to spend the money on some nice project somewhere than on reducing the operation’s actual water footprint,” Dr. Hoekstra says.

Even so, helpful and clear water-footprint labels won’t tell the whole story. Listing the volume of water used to grow an orange doesn’t tell a consumer anything about the agricultural or water systems in the place where it was grown. For example, would an apple grown in rainy British Columbia carry as high an ecological price as one in an irrigated grove in California that piped water in and depleted groundwater sources hundreds of kilometres away?

And water footprints combined with carbon footprints could become even more confusing for harried shoppers: Which is more important?

“You cannot convey all information in a label about water and its complexities in an easy way,” Dr. Hoekstra concedes. So even the creator of the water footprint acknowledges that for consumers, it won’t be easy being blue.

CNBC – Dollar Will be Utterly Destroyed, Global Currency, New World Order

Youtube | Nov 6, 2009

Posted by: SignificantImagery

The dollar will get “utterly destroyed” and become “virtually worthless”, said Damon Vickers, chief investment officer of Nine Points Capital Partners. Due to the huge wage disparities between the United States and emerging markets like China, Vickers said that may resolve itself in some type of a global currency crisis.

“If the global currency crisis unfolds, then inevitably you get an alignment of a global world government. A new global currency and a new world order, so we may be moving towards that,” he said.

For those who have claimed this is a fake clip I suggest you visit CNBC’s website:

http://www.cnbc.com/id/33709379

Note the inverted pyramid/illuminati triangle with the hypnotic spinning lights of Nine Points Capital Partners in the background. – PJ

Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth sequel program recruits world religions for holy war on changing climate

goreAl Gore. Photograph by Graeme Robertson

“I’ve done a Christian [-based] training program; I have a Muslim training program and a Jewish training program coming up, also a Hindu program coming up. I trained 200 Christian ministers and lay leaders here in Nashville in a version of the slide show that is filled with scriptural references. It’s probably my favourite version, but I don’t use it very often because it can come off as proselytising.”

Nobel winner adapts fact-based message to reach those who believe they have a moral duty to protect the planet in Our Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis

guardian.co.uk | Nov 2, 2009

Al Gore’s Inconvenient Truth sequel stresses spiritual argument on climate

by Suzanne Goldenberg

Al’s Gore’s much-anticipated sequel to An Inconvenent Truth is published today, with an admission that facts alone will not persuade Americans to act on global warming and that appealing to their spiritual side is the way forward.

In his latest book, Our Choice: A Plan to Solve the Climate Crisis, the man who won a Nobel prize in 2007 for his touring slideshow on disappearing polar ice and other consequences of climate change, concludes: “Simply laying out the facts won’t work.”

Instead, Gore tells Newsweek magazine in a pre-publication interview, that he has been adapting his fact-based message – now put out by hundreds of volunteers – to appeal to those who believe there is a moral or religious duty to protect the planet.

“I’ve done a Christian [-based] training program; I have a Muslim training program and a Jewish training program coming up, also a Hindu program coming up. I trained 200 Christian ministers and lay leaders here in Nashville in a version of the slide show that is filled with scriptural references. It’s probably my favourite version, but I don’t use it very often because it can come off as proselytising,” Gore tells Newsweek.

Gore’s book arrives at a time of intense international scrutiny of America’s moves on the environment ahead of an international meeting on global warming at Copenhagen, now just more than a month away.

It draws on the scholarly approach Gore developed for Inconvenient Truth. Since 2007, the former vice-president has been calling experts together from fields ranging from agriculture to neuroscience to discuss possible solutions to climate change.

The book draws on 30 such “solutions summits”, as well as Gore’s countless telephone conversations with scientists at America’s best institutions. According to the book’s press release, “Among the most unique approaches Gore takes in the book is showing readers how our own minds can be an impediment to change.”

New polling last month showed a steep decline in the numbers of Americans who share Gore’s sense of urgency in acting on climate change.

Related

Gore poised to become world’s first “carbon billionaire”

The book aims to reach those Americans by familiarising readers with emerging alternative energy sources, such as geothermal, biomass and wind power, as well as the possibilities of making cleaner coal power plants, and developing a more efficient and responsive “smart” electrical grid.

Gore also explores how deforestation, soil erosion, and the rising world population are multiplying the effects of rising greenhouse gas emissions.

Much of the material was developed through the series of brainstorming sessions organised by Gore. Since 2007, the former vice-president has been calling experts together to discuss possible solutions to climate change. He has also held countless telephone conversations with scientists at America’s best institutions.

“He is one of the only politicians that takes the time to actually talk to scientists who are producing the cutting-edge stuff and he comes in with questions. He doesn’t ask us how our results impinge on a particular policy he actually asks about science,” said Gavin Schmidt, a climatologist at Nasa’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, who spoke to Gore along with colleagues four or five times for the book. “Nobody that we have dealt with has ever taken as much time to understand the subtlety of the science and all the different complications and what it all means as Al Gore.”

Those conversations led Gore to politically inconvenient conclusions in this new book. In his conversations with Schmidt and other colleagues at the beginning of the year, Gore explored new studies – published only last week – that show methane and black carbon or soot had a far greater impact on global warming than previously thought. Carbon dioxide – while the focus of the politics of climate change – produces around 40% of the actual warming.

Gore acknowledged to Newsweek that the findings could complicate efforts to build a political consensus around the need to limit carbon emissions.

“Over the years I have been among those who focused most of all on CO2, and I think that’s still justified,” he told the magazine. “But a comprehensive plan to solve the climate crisis has to widen the focus to encompass strategies for all” of the greenhouse culprits identified in the Nasa study.

The former vice-president has been working behind the scenes to try to nudge the White House and Congress to move forward on a 920-page proposed law to cut America’s greenhouse gas emissions and encourage its use of clean energy sources like solar and wind power.

On Saturday, he told the German newspaper, Der Spiegel, he was “almost certain” Obama would attend the negotiations. The White House has so far refused to make a commitment.

But Gore has also been confronted with almost daily fresh reminders of the difficulties of prodding Americans to action.

The proposed legislation has set off a ferocious debate about the costs of dealing with climate change – with conservative Democrats and Republicans saying reducing America’s use of oil will deepen unemployment and hurt average American families.

Republicans in the Senate have threatened to boycott a session today that had been called to move forward a draft of a 920-page proposed law to deal with climate change.

Progress on the bill is seen as crucial to getting a binding deal at Copenhagen. Barbara Boxer, the chair of the Senate’s environment and public works committee, said yesterday she was ready to move ahead without any Republican participation.

__________
Glenn Beck-Lord Monckton Debate Global Warming

Obama’s H1N1 Swine Flu “National Emergency”: Evidences Vaccine Market-Building for Mass Murder

biohazard sign

Pal Telegraph | Nov 2, 2009

by Leonard Horowitz and Sherri Kane

US, November 2, 2009, (Pal Telegraph) – Los Angeles–President Obama’s declared H1N1 emergency cannot be reconciled by either vaccine shortages or flu cases; only by medical “market-building,” vaccination intoxications, and mass murder for population reduction says common sense and mounting evidence. Over the weekend, initial reports from Reuters News Service and Fox News stated that the President’s declaration was intended to prepare the country in case of “a rapid increase in illness that may overburden health care resources.” The media quoted an unidentified administration official saying, “It’s important to note that this is a proactive measure — not a response to a new development.” This action was “similar to disaster declarations issued before hurricanes hit coastal areas,” Reuters reported.

Why would the Obama administration anticipate an H1N1 “hurricane” to hit when Purdue researchers concluded last week the epidemic was expected to peak this week? In fact, too soon for vaccines to be helpful.

Thus, most people getting vaccinated now risk side effects for NOTHING–no benefit what-so-ever!

Furthermore, CBS News determined last week the CDC’s reported H1N1 cases had been overblown up to 97 percent. Only about 1,000 people have died of H1N1 since April’s Mexican outbreak. That is merely 1/18th, or less than 6%, of expected deaths from a normal seasonal flu during the same time period.

It is highly suspicious that David A. Paterson, New York State’s Governor, suddenly suspended “mandatory” H1N1 shots for health professionals citing vaccine shortages, not litigation exposures, as cause for the policy change.

Neglecting notice that more than 60 percent of nurses in New York State refused to take the H1N1 vaccines according to polls, and unions had filed lawsuits against New York and Washington State to gain injunctions against mandated injections, Paterson’s yellow press blamed “limited vaccine supplies” as reason to inject pregnant women and children exclusively. Only two weeks earlier, New York State officials posted their first priority, “as established by the CDC,” to vaccinate health care workers and emergency medical services personnel.

Oddly, all this talk about sudden vaccine shortages being the cause of a federal emergency grossly contradicts what many health officials were saying merely three weeks ago. United Press International (UPI) reported, for instance, Dr. Judy Monroe, Indiana’s state health commissioner, said that an ample supply of the vaccine would be available for everyone by mid-October. Now, suddenly, there is an alleged shortage that compels mixed messages and general confusion.

Revelations of the Swine Flu and Forced Vaccinations

“Shortage Marketing” Disease and Death

“This is called “shortage marketing,” Dr. Leonard Horowitz explains. “It is an increasing trend in the industrial world to get consumers to purchase products that are unappealing, over-inventoried, or scarce.”

For weeks preceding Obama’s declaration of national emergency polls showed the vast majority of Americans, including health care workers, rejecting the seasonal and H1N1 flu vaccines. So with stockpiles high, despite allegations of manufacturing delays, the government’s promotions and policy changes simply reflect “shortage marketing.”

But this is a “superficial concern” according to Dr. Horowitz, who references neurobehavioral and neurocognitive disorders demonstrated in vaccine recipients who were normal before getting vaccinated. He credits the brilliant work of Andrew Moulden, MD, PhD, photographically detailing tremendous physical damage occurring following vaccinations. These previously unknown and unseen subtle changes in nerve function and physical appearance is now demonstrated in pictures by Dr. Moulden that are irrefutable in courts and the scientific world.

Dr. Horowitz, a Harvard-trained expert in behavioral science, media persuasion and public health education, has spent 20 years documenting drug industrialists’ and health officials’ criminal actions.

“The only way to reconcile President Obama’s declaration of emergency, given the increasing risks of vaccine injuries, post-peak diminishing risks of H1N1, and the anticipated public health nightmare caused by live viruses “shedding” from those vaccinated to unvaccinated persons, is to follow the flow of money,” Dr. Horowitz says. “In the process of shedding vaccination H1N1, the highly unstable shed virus is expected to pick up more lethal genes from other circulating viruses, including possibly H5N1 that kills nearly 60 percent of those infected.”

Dr. Horowitz notes that authorities have been mum on the triple recombinant H1N1 produced in labs for use in the “active” vaccine. Experts know this is highly unstable, because it is a man-made laboratory creation that did not evolve naturally over the millennia. This unstable mutant more readily recombines with other circulating viruses when it is shed for up to 3 weeks, thus exposing non-vaccinated people who are infected with other viruses.

This is the best explanation for Obama’s anticipated “hurricane,” explains Dr. Horowitz, who criticizes the mainstream media for completely neglecting this greatest risk while falsely reporting vaccine “shortages.” Something else is obviously happening behind the scenes that only seasoned investigators can discern, he says.

He diagnoses the alleged vaccine shortage as a profitable ploy used by those “who have outrageously obvious connections to the Population Council, the preeminent organization directing global depopulation, as encouraged by Obama’s science czar, John Holdren.

Dr. Holdren is the co-author of the 1977 book, Ecoscience, which calls for massive global depopulation using sterilizing vaccinations.

Dr. Horowitz points to the fact that Nonoxynol-9, a spermicidal drug causing spontaneous abortions in pregnant women, and birth defects in infants, is one of the many new “adjuvants” banned in the United States, but used by the American-based Baxter Company in their H1N1 flu vaccines stockpiled by European nations.

H1N1 Flu A Pharmaceutical Hoax

“Just get yer damn vaccine!”

Outrageous Conflicting Interests

Dr. Horowitz also suggests discerning conflicting interests between vaccine makers and the news sources that break the federal government’s announcements, in this case Reuters and FOX news.

Reuters is directed by Thomas H. Glocer, a Merck & Co. director making money from H1N1 vaccine sales through Merck’s subsidiary, CSL, Inc. Merck also sells Pneumovax, a vaccine suggested for use at the time influenza vaccines are given, yet contraindicated in people with active influenza infections.*

A “live” H1N1 vaccine infects those vaccinated with “active” viruses. Thus, Merck’s suggested Pneumovax usage is contraindicated according to their own package insert!

If that’s not bad enough, CSL, Inc. did its H1N1 vaccine safety testing on pregnant women, infants, and children at facilities financed by Rupert Murdoch and his family–the Royal Victoria Women’s Hospital directed by Elisabeth Murdoch, and the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute overseen by Rupert’s daughter-in-law Susan Murdoch. So much for FOX News’s impartiality.

The Wall Street Journal that announced “New York Ends Flu Shot Mandate for Health Care Workers” on October 23rd, is disqualified by way of its links to Merck also. . . . WSJ CEO Councilman, David Brennan, directs the AstraZeneca’s Flumist manufacturer, Medimmune, Inc. AstraZeneca drafted Brennan from Merck & Company, and appointed him CEO in 2006.

This pattern of gross conflicting interests, and coordinated multi-media genocidal counterintelligence, expands with reading Thomas Glocer’s article wherein Reuters plugs “an experimental new drug called peramivir, made by Biocryst Pharmaceuticals Inc.”**

Peramivir is produced by Jon P. Stonehouse’s BioCryst Pharmaceuticals, Inc. President and Chief Executive Officer, Stonehouse recently served as Senior Vice President of Corporate Development at (surprise, surprise) Merck. At Merck, Stonehouse was responsible for “leading strategic developments . . . [that] significantly changed the company,” according to BioCryst’s website.

The Partnership for New York City and Council for Depopulation

It is obvious that our H1N1 “intelligence” is being gathered and broadcast from the highest levels of the medical-media’s mafia. As previously reported in Dr. Horowitz’s “AFFIDAVIT,” submitted to the FBI earlier this month, and filed last week in a lawsuit against federal officials in Washington State, David Rockefeller, Rupert Murdoch, Thomas Glocer, and other media moguls are partnered in the world’s most powerful drug ring and biotechnology consortium. Its members include the government of New York State as well as the US Federal Government. Proof of these facts are available for inspection online at The Partnership for New York City (PFNYC). The site provides its members list and related pharmaceutical industry activities.

The Founder of PFNYC, David Rockefeller, wields tremendous influence over many of the foundations and institutions that direct the US Federal Government’s policies and practices. American “health care reform” is currently directed, on behalf of the Democratic party, by Sen. Jay Rockefeller.

The Rockefeller Brothers Fund granted millions of dollars to the Population Council of the City of New York during its formative years. Rockefeller family members founded this Population Council, according to The Rockefeller Archive Center. The organization currently advances globally as the world’s premier depopulation advocacy group. The US Federal Government and private institutions fund the Population Council at this time.

Doctor Oz Advises Kids To Get H1N1 Shot But Not His Own

Summary and Conclusion

“Biopreparedness” for the 2009 H1N1 Swine Flu is all about mind manipulation and vaccination for population reduction.

In the past week, the swine flu situation went from near ending to causing a “National Emergency.” People, aware of the dangers of H1N1 vaccinations, opted out and gained precedent-setting federal court prohibitions on mandatory vaccinations. CBS declared the numbers of H1N1 cases fraudulently overstated by the CDC, and additional lawsuits were filed exposing State and Federal officials for genocidal malfeasance.

Rather than admitting disgrace, government spin doctors integrated vaccine “shortage marketing” as a distraction for public consumption. New York State Health Commissioner, Richard F. Daines, who said only a week ago that health workers must be vaccinated for the seasonal flu and the H1N1 virus, or risk discipline, said that scarce vaccines would be given exclusively to pregnant women and children.

Ironically, US Health and Human Services Secretary, Kathleen Sebelius, pledged 10 percent of vaccines would be donated to other countries.

All of this preceded Barack Obama’s declaration of “National Emergency,” thus, exercising Executive power to implement The Model State Emergency Health Powers Act affecting most of the 50 States.

Obviously, none of this makes much sense unless you examine the fundamental and overriding intoxication and depopulation agendas, and what the media moguls know that few commoners learn: the H1N1 vaccines contain “live” viruses that are highly unstable. As laboratory “reverse engineered” genetically spliced germs, they are expected to recombine with more deadly viruses, possibly H5N1, by January, 2010. These new strains, circulating the globe, are projected to kill nearly 3 billion people. This Lex Lutheresque evil is obviously orchestrated by David Rockefeller’s family and friends that control vaccine manufacturing, “health care reform,” mass media persuasion, and global depopulation industries.

Like it or not, you are advised to prepare for the worst.

________

Related Information

Fight Back H1N1

Nigerian speculators create artificial scarcity of petroleum products

DPR threatens to deal with culprits

businessdayonline.com | Nov 1, 2009

by Olusola Bello

Artificial scarcity of premium motor spirit, better known as petrol hit Lagos, Abuja and neighbouring areas yesterday leading build ups of long queues at filling stations.

The Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR) says the cause is that some petroleum marketers are hoarding the product with a motive to profiteer from an unfounded anticipation of the deregulation of the nations petroleum downstream sector.

Billy Agha, the director of DPR warned today that petroleum marketers who were hoarding fuel would have themselves to blame if the continued to hoard the product.

Agha said some marketers and dealers were engaging in black marketpractices for the purpose of making undue and unofficial personal gain from petroleum product sales.

He said any marketer or distributor caught in the act would be severely dealt with.

Chavez orders Venezuelans to restrict showers to 3 minutes, stop singing

hugo Chavez

Baths and jacuzzis anti-communist. Venezuela’s President Hugo Chavez said he would create a ministry to deal with the electricity shortages  Photo: AP

Hugo Chavez tells Venezuelans not to sing in the shower

Telegraph | Oct 22, 2009

Hugo Chavez, the Venezuelan president, has called on his countrymen to stop singing in the shower to help save water and electricity.

The left-wing leader said they should attempt to wash in less than three minutes and breaking into song distract them.

“Some people sing in the shower, in the shower half an hour. No kids, three minutes is more than enough. I’ve counted, three minutes, and I don’t stink,” he said during a televised Cabinet meeting.

Getting into his stride, he went on to label baths and jacuzzis anti-communist.

“If you are going to lie back, in the bath, with the soap and you turn on the what’s it called, the Jacuzzi… imagine that, what kind of communism is that? We’re not in times of Jacuzzi,” he said, to laughter from his ministers.

Venezuela has suffered several serious blackouts in the past year because of rapidly growing demand and underinvestment.

It has been aggravated by a drop in water levels in hydroelectric dams that provide most of its energy.

Mr Chavez said he would create a ministry to deal with the electricity shortages, which have affected the image of his socialist revolution.

Calling for water conservation, he said low rainfall caused by the El Nino weather phenomenon meant water levels were critically low in the El Guri reservoir, one of the world’s largest dams.

He mentioned using aeroplanes to try to force rain from clouds and said the government would soon publish a decree prohibiting imports of low-efficiency electrical appliances. He called on ministries and state-run companies to cut energy consumption by 20 per cent immediately.